1887

Abstract

We have used a polyclonal antiserum to cell wall proteins of to isolate several clones from a cDNA λgt11 expression library. Affinity-purified antibody prepared to the fusion protein of one clone identified a 40 kDa moiety present in cell wall extracts from both morphologies of the organism. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated expression of this moiety at the cell surface. Sequencing of a pBluescript II genomic clone identified with the cDNA clone revealed an open reading frame for a 417 amino acid protein. The nucleotide sequence showed significant homology with 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) genes, with 88%, 77% and 76% nucleotide homology with the PGK genes from and respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence was consistent with this identification of the sequence as of This finding was confirmed by a positive immunological response of a commercially available purified PGK from with the affinity-purified antibody against the fusion protein of the cDNA clone. The presence of PGK in the cell wall was confirmed by two additional methods. Cell wall proteins were biotinylated with a derivative that does not permeate the cell membrane to distinguish extracellular from cytosolic proteins. Biotinylated PGK was detected among the biotinylated proteins obtained following streptavidin affinity chromatography. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the protein was present at the outer surface of the cell membrane and cell wall as well as expected in the cytoplasm. Northern blot analysis revealed that the gene transcript was present in cells growing under different conditions, including different media, temperatures and morphologies. Most of the enzyme activity was found in the cytosol. Low enzymic activity was detected in intact cells but not in culture filtrates. These observations confirmed that PGK is a bona fide cell wall protein of

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1997-02-01
2021-08-02
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