1887

Abstract

and produce an enzyme that hydrolyses hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulphate (CS). The secreted enzyme is specifically inhibited by gold sodium thiomalate and anti-bee-venom antibodies. The use of saturated substrate (HA or CS) transblots allowed the visualization of active enzyme directly from culture supernatants and is a useful tool in clarification of complex polysaccharide-degrading enzyme specificities. The affinity-purified extracellular enzyme of contains a single molecular species with a molecular mass of 59 kDa. Since it hydrolyses both HA and CS, it can more appropriately be termed a hyaluronoglucosaminidase (HGase). The HGase has been localized at the cell surface by electron microscopy and may play an active role in the degradation of connective tissue ground substance in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease.

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1996-09-01
2021-08-05
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