1887

Abstract

The accumulation and mobilization of glycogen have been measured in subjected to a variety of environmental and nutritional conditions. Depending on the conditions and the stage in the life cycle, glycogen represented from 10% to less than 1% of the dry weight of the mycelia. Maximum values were observed during the exponential growth phase irrespective of the carbon source used. The highest glycogen levels were detected with 2% (w/v) sorbitol as carbon source. A low glycogen content was present during growth on acetate. In these cultures glycogen was presumably synthesized from glyoxylate-dependent metabolites. Glycogen accumulated in cultures deprived specifically of nitrogen or phosphorus in the presence of an excess of a usable carbon source, suggesting that reserve carbohydrate accumulation is a general response to nutrient limitation. However, temporary starvation caused by removal of glucose or by transfer to media with relatively poor carbon sources such as acetate led to mobilization of glycogen in the mycelia. During sporulation the disappearance of glycogen was almost complete.

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1993-02-01
2021-07-26
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