1887

Abstract

Marker components of the phospholipids of and were identified for studies on the degradation of forage by these bacteria growing in mixed culture. The principal fatty acid methyl esters and dimethyl acetals detected varied between strains and were influenced by the addition of a mixture of higher volatile fatty acids and vitamins to the medium, but these effects were small compared to the differences between the species. When two strains of were grown on a mixture of clover and ryegrass, and on barley straw in the presence or absence of two strains of , the solubilization of plant material tended to be lowered by the presence of was the predominant bacterium among colonies recovered from roll tubes, and the phospholipids were primarily those of Analysis of the culture supernatant liquids showed that produced greater amounts of free and bound xylose from both clover and straw than did . With both forages, cultures containing the two species produced more soluble free arabinose, and less soluble-bound arabinose, than either species grown alone.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-139-11-2865
1993-11-01
2021-10-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/139/11/mic-139-11-2865.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-139-11-2865&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bernalier A. 1991 Les champignons anaerobies du rumen: caracterisation et interactions avec les bacteries du rumen dans la cellulyse, in vitro PhD thesis Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont Ferrand, France: No. d’ordre DU 281
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bernalier A., Fonty G., Bonnemoy F., Gouet F. 1992; Degradation and fermentation of cellulose by the rumen anaerobic fungi in axenic cultures or in association with cellulolytic bacteria. Current Microbiology 25:143–148
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bhat S., Wallace R. J., Orskov E. R. 1990; Adhesion of cellulolytic ruminal bacteria to barley straw. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 56:2698–2703
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bobbie R. J., White D. C. 1980; Characterization of benthnic microbial community structure by high resolution gas chromatography of fatty acid methyl esters. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 39:1212–1222
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bryant M. P. 1972; Commentary on the Hungate technique for the cultivation of strict anaerobes. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 25:1324–1328
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Bryant M. P., Burkey L. A. 1953; Numbers and some predominant groups of bacteria in the rumen of cows fed different rations. Journal of Dairy Science 36:218–224
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Cheng K.-J., Costerton J. W., Dinsdale D., Stewart C. S. 1983/84; Electron microscopy of bacteria involved in the digestion of plantcell walls. Animal Feed Science and Technology 10:93–120
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Christie W. W. 1982 Lipid Analysis: Isolation, Separation, Identification and Structural Analysis of Lipids Oxford: Pergamon Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Dehority B. A. 1968; Mechanisms of isolated hemicellulose and xylan degradation by celluloytic rumen bacteria. Applied Microbiology 16:781–786
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Dehority B. A., Scott H. W. 1967; Extent of cellulose and hemicellulose digestion in various forages by pure cultures of rumen bacteria. Journal of Dairy Science 50:1136–1141
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Drucker D. B. 1976; Gas-liquid chromatographic chemotaxonomy. Methods in Microbiology 9:51–125
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Englyst H. N., Cummings J. H. 1984; Simplified method for the measurement of total non-starch polysaccharides by gas-liquid chromatography of constituent sugars as alditol acetates. Analyst 109:937–942
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Feeding Stuffs (Sampling And Analysis) Regulations 1982 Luff-Schoorl method 10a p. 29 London: HMSO;
  14. Flint H. J., Mcpherson C. A., Bissett J. 1989; Molecular cloning of genes from Ruminococcus flavefaciens encoding xylanase and β(1–3,1–4) glucanase activities. Applied and Environmental Microbiology551230–1233
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Folch J., Lees M., Stanley G. H. S. 1957; A simple method for the isolation and purification of total lipids from animal tissues. Journal of Biological Chemistry 226:497–509
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Harfoot C. G., Hazlewood G. P. 1988; Lipid metabolism in the rumen. In The Rumen Microbial Ecosystem pp. 285–322. Hobson P. N. Edited by London and New York: Elsevier Applied Science;
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Hobson P. N. 1969; Rumen bacteria. Methods in Microbiology 3B:133–149
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Hoebler C., Barry J. L., David A., Delort-Laval Y. 1989; Rapid hydrolysis of plant cell wall polysaccharides and simplified quantitative determination of the neutral monosaccharides by gas-liquid chromatography. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 37:360–367
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Hungate R. E. 1966 The Rumen and its Microbes New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Hungate R. E. 1969; A roll tube method for cultivation of strict anaerobes. Methods in Microbiology 3B:117–132
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Irvine H. L., Stewart C. S. 1991; Interactions between anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria and fungi in the presence of Methanobrevibacter smithii. Letters in Applied Microbiology 12:62–64
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Kistner A., Gouws L., Gilchrist F. M. C. 1962; Bacteria of the ovine rumen. II. The functional groups fermenting carbohydrates and lactate on a diet of lucerne (Medicago sativa) hay. Journal of Agricultural Science 59:85–91
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Kolankaya N., Stewart C. S., Duncan S. H., Cheng K.-J., Costerton J. W. 1985; The effect of ammonia treatment on the solubilization of straw and the growth of cellulolytic rumen bacteria. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 58:371–379
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Latham M. J., Brooker B. E., Pettipher G. L., Harris P. J. 1978; Adhesion of Bacteroides succinogenes in pure culture and in the presence of Ruminococcus flavefaciens to cell walls in leaves of perennial ryegrass (L. perenne). Applied and Environmental Microbiology 35:1166–1173
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Mackie R. I., Gilchrist F. M. C., Robberts A. M., Hannah P. E., Schwartz H. M. 1978; Microbiological and chemical changes in the rumen during the stepwise adaptation of sheep to high concentrate diets. Journal of Agricultural Science 90:241–254
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Mckinley V. L., Vestal J. R. 1984; Biokinetic analysis of adaptation and succession: microbial activity in composting sewage sludge. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 47:933–941
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Minato H., Suto T. 1981; Technique for fractionation of bacteria in rumen microbial ecosystem. IV. Attachment of rumen bacteria to cellulose powder and elution of bacteria attached to it. Journal of General and Applied Microbiology 27:21–31
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Minato H., Miyagawa E., Suto T. 1990; Techniques for analysis of rumen microbial ecosystems. In The Rumen Ecosystem pp. 3–12 Hoshino S., Onodera R., Minato H., Itabashi H. Edited by Tokyo: Japan Scientific Societies Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Miron J. 1991; The hydrolysis of lucerne cell-wall monosaccharide components by monocultures or pair combinations of defined ruminal bacteria. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 70:245–252
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Miyagawa E. 1982; Cellular fatty acid and fatty aldehyde composition of rumen bacteria. Journal of General and Applied Microbiology 28:389–408
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Miyagawa E., Azuma R., Suto T. 1979; Cellular fatty acid composition in Gram-negative obligately anaerobic rods. Journal of General and Applied Microbiology 25:41–51
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Morris E. J., Van Gylswyk N. O. 1980; Comparison of the action of rumen bacteria on cell walls of Eragrostis tef. Journal of Agricultural Science 95:313–323
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Stewart C. S., Walsh J. H. 1972; Cellulolytic activity of pure and mixed cultures of fungi. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 58:527–531
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Stewart C. S., Flint H. J., Nekrep F. V. 1991; Degradation of plant cell wall polymers by the anaerobic rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens. In Production and Utilization of Lignocellulosics pp. 387–399 Galletti G. C. Edited by London and New York: Elsevier Applied Science;
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Stewart C. S., Paniagua C., Dinsdale D., Cheng K.-J., Garrow S. H. 1981; Selective isolation and characteristics of Bacteroides succinogenes from the rumen of a cow. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 41:504–510
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Stewart C. S., Duncan S. H., Richardson A. J., Backwell C., Begbie R. 1992; The inhibition of fungal cellulolysis by cell-free preparations from ruminococci. FEMS Microbiology Letters 97:83–88
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Van Gylswyk N. O. 1970; The effect of supplementing a low protein hay on the cellulolytic bacteria in the rumen of sheep and on the digestibility of cellulose and hemicellulose. Journal of Agricultural Science 74:169–180
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Van Soest P. J. 1981; Limiting factors in plant residues of low biodegradability. Agriculture and Environment 6:135–143
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Varel V. H., Richardson A. J., Stewart C. S. 1989; Degradation of barley straw, ryegrass, and alfalfa cell walls by Clostridium longisporum and Ruminococcus albus. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 55:3080–3084
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Verkley A. J., Ververgaert P.H.J.T., Prins R. A., Van Golde L. M. G. 1975; Lipid-phase transitions of the strictly anaerobic bacteria Veillonella parvula and Anaerovibrio lipolytica. Journal of Bacteriology 124:1522–1528
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Vestal J. R., White D. C. 1989; Lipid analysis in microbial ecology. Bioscience 39:535–541
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Watanabe T., Okuda S.-I., Takahashi H. 1982; Physiological importance of even numbered fatty acids and aldehydes in plasmalogen phospholipids of Selenomonas ruminantium. Journal of General and Applied Microbiology 28:23–33
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-139-11-2865
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-139-11-2865
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error