1887

Abstract

Approximately 50% (15/28) of a selection of oral isolates of from separate individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exhibited low susceptibility to ketoconazole as determined by hyphal elongation assessment. Nine of these isolates exhibited colony morphology variation or switching at 37°C, of which six expressed low ketoconazole susceptibility. To determine whether colony morphology variation could give rise to derivatives with reduced azole susceptibility, several high-frequency switching variants of three HIV-patient isolates were recovered and assessed. All but one of the variants expressed similar azole susceptibility profiles to their respective parental strains. However, the derivative 132ACR expressed significantly reduced susceptibility to ketoconazole in comparison to its parental strain 132A. In whole cells, on the basis of total growth the switched derivative 132ACR was markedly less susceptible than its parental isolate 132A to ketoconazole at 10 μM. A much smaller difference was observed with fluconazole at 10 μM, with the switched derivative 132ACR exhibiting a threefold lower susceptibility compared with the parental isolate 132A. The incorporation of [C]acetate in control and azole-treated cells of both organisms was higher for the parental strain. When cell lysates of strain 132A and its derivative 132ACR were incubated with [C]mevalonic acid and ketoconazole, the IC for C-label incorporation into C-4 demethyl sterols was fivefold higher for lysates of the switched derivative 132ACR compared with those of the parental strain 132A. With fluconazole the IC value for the derivative 132ACR was 25-fold higher than for strain 132A. The 14-sterol demethylase of the switched derivative 132ACR was possibly less sensitive to azole inhibition than that of the enzyme of strain 132A. These studies indicated that colony morphology variation can generate derivatives with stable, reduced azole susceptibility without prior exposure to azoles.

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1992-09-01
2021-05-10
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