1887

Abstract

One-hundred-and-four isolates of yeast were collected from the vaginas of 97 outpatients. The isolates were identified by their characteristics in a carbohydrate assimilation test, a serological test and from their morphology. and were the major isolates (75% and 20%, respectively). The karyotypes of the isolates were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and almost all the karyotypes were distinguishable from one another when the band mobilities were carefully compared. Characteristics and karyotypes were not directly correlated, but seven isolates (from six patients) had a common atypical karyotype and shared the same phenotype. These isolates are inferred to be generated by a wide genomic reorganization and mutation and the phenotypic changes may be advantageous for survival. The karyotypes of the isolates recovered from individual patients after intervals of 1–6 months were all identical except for one or two highly variable bands which were identified with an rDNA probe. This suggests that the variable bands are too variable to be useful for distinguishing strains, but from the patterns of the identical bands (i.e. except for the variable bands) we concluded that strains from individual patients do not change, at least over short periods. This, coupled with the extensive inter-isolate variability in karyotype, will be useful for source determination and epidemiological studies.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-11-2531
1991-11-01
2021-05-14
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/137/11/mic-137-11-2531.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-11-2531&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Buesching W. J., Kurek K., Roberts G. D. 1979; Evaluation of the modified API 20C system for identification of clinically important yeasts. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 9:565–569
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Fox B. C., Mobley H. L .T., Wade J. C. 1989; The use of a DNA probe for epidemiological studies of candidiasis in immunocompro-mised hosts. Journal of Infectious Diseases 159:488–494
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Iwaguchi S.-I., Homma M., Tanaka K. 1990; Variation in the electrophoretic karyotype analysed by the assignment of DNA probes in Candida albicans . Journal of General Microbiology 136:2433–2442
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Kaufmann C. S., Merz W. G. 1989; Electrophoretic karyotypes of Torulopsis glabrata . Journal of Clinical Microbiology 27:2165–2168
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Kwong-Chung K. J., , Riggsby W. S., Uphoff R. A., Hicks J. B., Whelan W. L. 1989; Genetic differences between Type I and Type II Candida stellatoidea . Infection and Immunity 57:527–532
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Lasker B. A., Carle G. F., Kobayashi G. S., Medoff G. 1989; Comparison of the separation of Candida albicans chromosome-sized DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. Nucleic Acids Research 17:3783–3793
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Magee B. B., Koltin Y., Gorman J. A., Magee P. T. 1988; Assignment of cloned genes to the seven electrophoretically separated Candida albicans chromosomes. Molecular and Cellular Biology 8:4721–4726
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Mahrous M., Lott T. J., Meyer S. A., Sawant A. D., Ahearn D. G. 1990; Electrophoretic karyotyping of typical and atypical Candida albicans . Journal of Clinical Microbiology 28:876–881
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Mason M. M., Lasker B. A., Riggsby W. S. 1987; Molecular probe for identification of medically important Candida species and Torulopsis glabrata . Journal of Clinical Microbiology 25:563–566
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Merz W. G. 1990; Candida albicans strain delineation. Clinical Microbiology Reviews 3:321–334
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Merz W. G., Connelly C., Hieter P. 1988; Variation of electrophoretic karyotypes among clinical isolates of Candida albicans . Journal of Clinical Microbiology 26:842–845
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Monod M., Porchet S., Baudraz-Rosselet F. B., Frenk E. 1990; The identification of pathogenic yeast strains by electrophoretic analysis of their chromosomes. Journal of Medical Microbiology 32:123–129
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Mortimer R. K., Schild D. 1985; Genetic map of Saccharomyces cerevisiae edition 9. Microbiological Reviews 49:181–212
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Rikkerink E. H., Magee B. B., Magee P. T. 1990; Genomic structure of Candida stellatoidea : extra chromosomes and gene duplication. Infection and Immunity 58:949–954
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Rustchenko-Bulgac E. P., , Sherman F., Hicks J. B. 1990; Chromosomal rearrangements associated with morphological mutants provide a means for genetic variation of Candida albicans . Journal of Bacteriology 172:1276–1283
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Scherer S., Magee P. T. 1990; Genetics of Candida albicans . Microbiological Reviews 54:226–241
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Scherer S., Stevens D. A. 1987; Application of DNA typing methods to epidemiology and taxonomy of Candida species. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 25:675–679
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Schwartz D. C., Cantor C. R. 1984; Separation of yeast chromosome-sized DNAs by pulse field gradient gel electrophoresis. Cell 37:67–75
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Shinoda T., Kaufman L., Padhye A. A. 1981; Comparative evaluation of the Iatron serological candida check kit and the API 20 C kit for identification of medically important Candida species. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 13:513–578
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Soll D. R., Galask R., Isley S., Rao T. V. G., Stone D., Hicks J., Schmid J., Mac K., Hanna C. 1989; Switching of Candida albicans during successive episodes of recurrent vaginitis. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 27:681–690
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Sugihara K., Ohishi K., ToH-E A. 1986; Ribosomal DNA plasmid isolated from Zygosaccharomyces bailii and its use for constructing yeast vectors effective for intergeneric gene transfer. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 50:1503–1512
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Suzuki T., Kobayashi I., Mizuguchi I., Banno I., Tanaka K. 1988; Electrophoretic karyotypes in medically important Candida species. Journal of General and Applied Microbiology 34:409–416
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Suzuki T., Kobayashi I., Kanbe T., Tanaka K. 1989; High frequency variation of colony morphology and chromosome reorganization in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans . Journal of General Microbiology 135:425–434
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Szostak J. W., Wu R. 1980; Unequal crossing over in the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Nature London: 284426–430
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Vollrath D., Davis R. W. 1987; Resolution of DNA molecules greater than 5 megabases by contour-clamped homogenous electric fields. Nucleic Acids Research 15:7865–7876
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Wickes B. L., Golin J. E., Kwon-Chung K. J. 1991; Chromosomal rearrangement in Candida stellatoidea results in a positive effect on phenotype. Infection and Immunity 59:1762–1771
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-11-2531
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-11-2531
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error