1887

Abstract

mRNA levels were followed through the growth cycle in mutant and wild-type cells of Levels were high during the first (glucose) phase of growth, and were reduced sharply during the second (ethanol) phase of growth. Transcript levels of the glycolytic genes and were also measured; they each showed a pattern similar to that of , whereas transcript levels of the gene remained constant throughout the cycle, showing that a decrease in transcription is not a general feature of genes. These results make it unlikely that the product acts as an inhibitor of cell proliferation which is activated upon carbon starvation. No difference was observed between the pattern of expression of mutant and wild-type strains, showing that the mutant phenotype was not the result of a change in regulation at the transcriptional level.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-136-4-727
1990-04-01
2021-05-14
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