1887

Abstract

Bacteriophage FP22 has a very broad host range within streptomycetes and appeared to form lysogens of ATCC 15154. FP22 shared strong cross-immunity and antibody cross-reactivity with bacteriophage P23, but not with seven other streptomycete bacteriophages. FP22 particles had a head diameter of 71 nm and a tail length of 307 nm. The FP22 genome was 131 kb, which is the largest bacteriophage genome reported for streptomycetes. The G + C content of the genome was 46 mol% and restriction mapping indicated that FP22 DNA had discrete ends. NaCl- and pyrophosphate-resistant deletion mutants were readily isolated and the extent of the deletions defined at least 23 kb of dispensable DNA in two regions of the genome. The DNA was not cleaved by most restriction endonucleases (or isoschizomers) which have been identified in the streptomycetes, including the tetranucleotide cutter (GATC).

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1990-12-01
2021-10-28
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