1887

Abstract

Aspartokinase activity was detected in extracts from (recovered from armadillo liver) and in grown axenically and . Homoserine dehydrogenase activity was only detected in and in grown axenically. Activities, when detected, were 50 to 70% lower in or grown than in axenically grown . In these two pathogenic mycobacteria, aspartokinase and homoserine dehydrogenase are subject to feedback inhibition by methionine - an additional regulator over those observed for the enzymes from . Intact mycobacterium incorporated carbon from [U-C]aspartate into the aspartate family of amino acids (threonine, isoleucine, methionine and lysine) though the rate of incorporation in grown was about half that in grown axenically.

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1990-01-01
2021-10-27
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