1887

Abstract

strain Y2, isolated from soil by enrichment culture using 1-chlorobutane, was able to utilize a range of halogenated aliphatic compounds as sole sources of carbon and energy. The ability to utilize 1-chlorobutane was conferred by a single halidohydrolase-type haloalkane dehalogenase. The presence of the single enzyme in cell-free extracts was demonstrated by activity stain polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with a relative molecular mass of 34 kDa and demonstrated activity against a broad range of haloalkanes, haloalcohols and haloethers. The highest activity was found towards α, ω disubstituted chloro- and bromo- C–C alkanes and 4-chlorobutanol. The value of the enzyme for 1-chlorobutane was 0·26 m. A comparison of the Y2 haloalkane halidohydrolase with other haloalkane dehalogenases is discussed on the basis of biochemical properties and N-terminal amino acid sequence data.

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1990-01-01
2021-07-31
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