1887

Abstract

An auxotroph of , A1-pyr, was isolated after mutagenesis of ascospores with ultraviolet light. Addition of cytosine and to a lesser extent uracil, but not thymidine, to minimal medium permitted growth of this auxotroph. Protoplasts of Al-pyr failed to regenerate on Czapek agar medium without cytosine supplementation (20 mg 1); on cytosine-supplemented medium 0·1 % of protoplasts successfully regenerated. The mutant was avirulent on four of seven susceptible hosts unless an exogenous cytosine source was applied at the inoculation site. The requirement for external cytosine makes A1-pyr a potential candidate for use in biological weed control. While isolates of this fungus obtained from nature attack numerous beneficial crop and native plants, A1-pyr would be limited to the area of cytosine application, thus reducing the threat to beneficial plants.

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1989-07-01
2022-01-28
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