1887

Abstract

The placenta is the primary site of infection of and is also intimately involved in the control of parturition. Changes in the pattern of placental hormone secretion were investigated in ewes infected with and in saline-injected controls. The concentration of progesterone in peripheral plasma of infected sheep was significantly lower than in control sheep ( < 0·01). A gradual decline in plasma progesterone occurred in -infected sheep, beginning on day 125 of gestation, in comparison with the sharper decline commencing on day 139 of gestation in the control population. The release of oestradiol 17, which was greatest on the day of parturition in control sheep, was significantly ( < 0·02) increased on the day before parturition in -infected sheep. The concentrations of prostaglandin E in amniotic and allantoic fluids were low during late pregnancy in 12 control sheep, but were significantly raised ( < 0·05) in four out of 12 samples obtained from -infected sheep over the same period. The changes in progesterone and prostaglandin E were temporally related to the morphological and histochemical changes characteristic of trophoblast infection. These findings suggest that infection may precipitate premature labour by altering placental steroid and prostaglandin release.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-3-565
1989-03-01
2021-10-28
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/135/3/mic-135-3-565.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-3-565&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Aitken I.D. 1986; Chamydial abortion in sheep. In Practice 8:236–237
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Allen W.R. 1975; Endocrine functions of the placenta. In Comparative Placentation pp. 214–261 Steven D. H. Edited by London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bedford C.A., Challis J.R.G., Harrison F.A., Heap R.B. 1972; The role of oestrogens and progesterone in the onset of parturition in various species. Journal of Reproduction and Fertility Suppl. 16:1–23
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Beer R.J.S., Bradford W.P., Hart R.J.C. 1982; Pregnancy complicated by psittacosis acquired from sheep. British Medical Journal 284:1156–1157
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bleasdale J.E., Johnston J.M. 1984; Prostaglandins and human parturition: regulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. Reviews of Perinatal Medicine 5:151–191
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Bose S.K., Goswami P.C. 1986; Enhancement of adherence and growth of Chlamydia trachomatis by estrogen treatment of HeLa cells. Infection and Immunity 53:646–650
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Dray F., Frydman R. 1976; Primary prostaglandins in amniotic fluid in pregnancy and spontaneous labour. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 126:13–20
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Finlayson J., Buxton D., Anderson I.E., Donald K.M. 1985; Direct immunoperoxidase method for demonstrating Chlamydia psittaci in tissue sections. Journal of Clinical Pathology 38:712–714
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Fredriksson G., Buxton D., Carlsson U., Edquist L.E., Elvander M., Kindhahl H., Uggla A. 1988; Effect of bovine virus diarrhoea virus, Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci on pregnancy in the ewe monitored by ultrasound scanning and levels of 15-keto-13,14-dihydro-PGFprogesterone and estrone sulphate. Proceedings of the XI International Congress of Animal Reproduction 4:515–517
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Grieves S.A., Liggins G.C. 1976; Phospholipase A activity in human and ovine uterine tissues. Prostaglandins 12:229–242
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Helm C.W., Smart G.E., Gray J.A., Cumming A.D., Lambie A.T., Smith I.W., Allan N.C. 1987; Exposure to Chlamydia psittaci in pregnancy. Lancet I:1144–1145
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Hunter W.M. 1978; Radioimmunoassay. In Handbook of Experimental Immunology pp. 17.1–17.36 Weir D. M. Edited by Oxford: Blackwell;
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Johnson F.W.A., Matheson B.A., Williams H., Laing A.G., Jandial V., Davidson-Lamb R., Halliday G.J., Hobson D., Wong S.Y., Hadley K.M., Moffat M.A.J., Postle-Thwaite R. 1985; Abortion due to infection with Chlamydia psittaci in a sheep farmer’s wife. British Medical Journal 290:592–594
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Keirse J.N.C., Thiery M., Parenijk W., Mitchell M.D. 1983; Chronic stimulation of uterine oestradiol synthesis during cervical ripening. Prostaglandins 25:671–681
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Lamont R.F, Elder M.G. 1985; Effect of bacterial products on prostaglandin E production by amnion cells. Lancet II:1331–1333
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Leaver H.A., Macpherson H.D., Hutchon D.J.R. 1987; Amniotic fluid prostaglandin F measured at artificial rupture of the membranes, predicts the subsequent progress of labour. Prostaglandins, Leucotrienes and Medicine 28:237–241
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Leaver H.A., Richmond D.H., Macpherson H.D., Hutchon D.J.R. 1988; Prostaglandin E2 in induction of labour: a pharmacokinetic study of dose and treatment protocols. Prostaglandins, Leucotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids 31:1–13
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Lewis G.P. 1983; Immunoregulatory activity of metabolites of arachidonic acid and their role in inflammation. British Medical Bulletin 39:243–248
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Liggins G.C., Grieves S.A., Kendall J.Z., Knox B.S. 1972; The physiological role of progesterone, oestradiol 17β, and prostaglandin Fin the control of parturition. Journal of Reproduction and Fertility Suppl. 16:85–103
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Linzell J.L., Heap R.B. 1968; Progesterone metabolism in the sheep and goat: production and uptake by target organs. Journal of Endocrinology 73:433–438
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Martel J.L., Perrin M., Rodakis A., Russo P., Deschand J.P., Garnier F. 1983; Infection experimentale de la vache gestante par Chlamydia psittaci . Annales de recherches veterinaires 14:117–120
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Mcewen A.D., Stamp J.T., Littlejohn A.I. 1951; Enzootic abortion in ewes: immunisation and infection. Veterinary Record 63:197–201
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Mellor D.J. 1980; Investigations of fluid spaces of the sheep conceptus. In Animal Models in Fetal Medicine pp. 61–106 Nathanielz P. W. Edited by Amsterdam: Elsevier;
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Minkoff H. 1983; Prematurity: infection as an etiologic factor. Obstetrics and Gynecology 62:137–144
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Mitchell M.D., Brennecke S.P., Kraemer D.L., Webb R. 1983; Progesterone withdrawal without parturition. European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 15:25–30
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Moroney M.J. 1951 Facts from Figures. Harmondsworth:: Penguin Books.;
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Novilla M.N., Jensen R. 1970; Placental pathology of experimentally induced enzootic abortion in ewes. American Journal of Veterinary Research 31:1983–2000
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Olson D.M., Lye S.L., Skinner K., Challis J.R.G. 1984; Early changes in PG concentration in dispersed cells from ovine uterine tissues. Journal of Reproduction and Fertility 71:45–55
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Rank R.G., White H.J., Hough A.J., Pasley J.N., Bouron A.L. 1982; Effect of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection of female guinea pigs. Infection and Immunity 38:699–705
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Roberts J.S., Barcikowski B., Wilson L., Skarness R.C., Mccracken J.A. 1975; Hormonal and related factors affecting the release of prostaglandin F from the uterus. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry 6:1091–1097
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Roberts W., Grist N.R., Giroud P. 1967; Human abortion associated with infection by ovine abortion agent. British Medical Journal iv:37–41
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Romero R., Hobbins J.C., Mitchell M.D. 1988; Endotoxin stimulates prostaglandin E2 production by human amnion. Obstetrics and Gynecology 157:815–820
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Scaramuzzi R.J., Corker C.S., Young G., Baird D.T. 1974; Production of antisera to steroid hormones in sheep. In Steroid Immunoassay: Proceedings of Fifth Tenovus Workshop pp. 111–122 Cameron E. H. D. Edited by Cardiff: Alpha Omega Publishing;
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Silver R.K., Gibbs R.S., Castillo M. 1986; Effect of amniotic fluid bacteria on the course of labour in nulliparous women at term. Obstetrics and Gynecology 68:587–592
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Smith I.D., Hughes K.L. 1974; Progesterone concentrations in the peripheral plasma of pregnant ewes following infection with an abortifacient organism. Research in Veterinary Science 16:116–118
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Stamp J.T., Mcewen A.D., Watt J.A.A., Nisbet D.I. 1950; Enzootic abortion in ewes: transmission of the diseases. Veterinary Record 62:251–254
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Studdert M.J. 1968; Bedsonia abortion of sheep: pathology and pathogenesis. Research in Veterinary Science 9:57–64
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Studdert M.J., Mckercher D.G. 1968; Bedsonia abortion of sheep: aetiological studies. Research in Veterinary Science 9:48–56
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Sugarman B., Agbor P. 1986; Estrogens and Chlamydia trachomatis . Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 183:125–131
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Sweet R.L., Landers D.V., Walker C., Schachter J. 1987; Chlamydia trachomatisinfection and pregnancy outcome. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 156:824–833
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Taylor M.J., Webb R., Mitchell M.D., Robinson J.S. 1982; Effect of progesterone withdrawal in sheep during late pregnancy. Journal of Endocrinology 92:85–93
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Thorburn G., Challis J.R. 1979; Endocrine control of parturition. Physiological Reviews 59:863–918
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Wickland M., Lindbloom B., Wiquist N. 1984; Myometrial response to PG during labour. Gynaecological and Obstetrical Investigation 17:131–138
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-3-565
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-3-565
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error