1887

Abstract

is a halophilic phototrophic bacterium that has been isolated from soda lakes containing high concentrations of sulphate, chloride and carbonates. It utilizes reduced sulphur compounds as photosynthetic electron donors and oxidizes them to sulphate, but can also grow photoheterotrophically with sulphate as sole sulphur source. The requirements for, and the cytoplasmic concentrations of, sulphate and chloride have been determined. High concentrations of sulphate are neither required for nor inhibit growth. Although chloride is by far the dominant anion of the environment, growth of occurs in the absence of added chloride. Sodium chloride can be replaced by sodium sulphate and sodium carbonate. Chloride is excluded from the cytoplasm with decreasing ratios of cytoplasmic/external chloride at increasing external chloride concentrations (under iso-osmotic conditions).

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1989-02-01
2022-01-28
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