1887

Abstract

Mutants of able to sporulate in the presence of 1% (w/v) glucose have been isolated. A single mutation, , is responsible for this phenotype. One of the mutants, A-20, was characterized biochemically. The mutants had generation times similar to that of the parental strain when growing with glucose or ethanol as carbon source, and on sporulation medium in the absence of glucose they behaved like the wild-type. In contrast, in the presence of glucose, mutant A-20 raised the pH of the medium and degraded glycogen after an initial period of accumulation. This behaviour was not observed in the wild-type. cAMP concentration increased in the mutant after addition of glucose, although to a lesser extent than in the parent. A marked difference between the mutant and the wild-type was the slow utilization of glucose by the mutant when placed in sporulation medium. In addition, in sporulation medium, the glucose uptake system was inactivated with different kinetics in the mutant compared with the wild-type. The mutation seems therefore to affect the glucose uptake system.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-1-203
1989-01-01
2021-05-13
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/135/1/mic-135-1-203.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-1-203&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Cid A., Gancedo C., Lagunas R. 1987; Inactivation of the glucose transport system in sporulating yeast. FEMS Microbiology Letters 41:59–61
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Colonna W., Magee P.T. 1978; Glycogenolytic enzymes in sporulating yeast. Journal of Bacteriology 134:844–853
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Dawes I.W., Hardie J.D. 1974; Selective killing of vegetative cells in sporulated yeast cultures by exposure to diethyl ether. Molecular and General Genetics 131:281–289
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Eraso P., Gancedo J.M. 1984; Catabolite repression in yeasts is not associated with low levels of cAMP. European Journal of Biochemistry 41:195–198
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Esposito R.E., Klapholz S. 1981; Meiosis and ascospore development. In The Molecular Biology of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1 pp. 211–287 Strathem J. N., Jones E. W., Broach J. R. Edited by Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Fowell R.R. 1967; Factors controlling the sporulation of yeasts. II. The sporulation phase. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 30:450–474
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Fowell R.R. 1969; Sporulation and hybridization of yeasts. In The Yeasts 1 pp. 303–383 Rose A. H., Harrison J. S. Edited by New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Hanes S.D., Koren R., Bostian K.A. 1986; Control of cell growth and division in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CRC Critical Reviews in Biochemistry 21:153–223
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kane S.M., Roth R. 1974; Carbohydrate metabolism during ascospore development in yeast. Journal of Bacteriology 118:8–14
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Lagunas R., Dominguez C., Busturia A., Saez M.J. 1982; Mechanisms of appearance of the Pasteur effect in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: inactivation of sugar transport systems. Journal of Bacteriology 152:19–25
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Matsumoto K., Uno I., Ishikawa T. 1985; Genetic analysis of the role of cAMP in yeast. Yeast 1:15–24
    [Google Scholar]
  12. MazÓn M.J., Gancedo J.M., Gancedo C. 1982; Phosphorylation and inactivation of yeast fructose-bisphosphatase in vivo by glucose and by proton ionophores.A possible role for cAMP. European Journal of Biochemistry 127:605–608
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Olempska-Beer Z., Freese E. 1987; Initiation of meiosis and sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiaedoes not require a decrease in cyclic AMP. Molecular and Cellular Biology 7:2141–2147
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Serrano R. 1980; Effect of ATPase inhibitors on the proton pump of respiratory deficient yeast. European Journal of Biochemistry 105:419–424
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Serrano R. 1983; In vivo glucose activation of the yeast plasma membrane ATPase. FEBS Letters 156:11–14
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Tatchell K., Robinson L.C., Breitenbach M. 1985; RAS2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for gluconeogenic growth and proper response to nutrient limitation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 82:3785–3789
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Van Der Plaat J.B., Van Solingen P. 1974; Cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate stimulates trehalose degradation in baker’s yeast. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 56:580–587
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Vezinhet F., Kinnaird J.H., Dawes I.W. 1979; The physiology of mutants derepressed for sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Journal of General Microbiology 115:391–402
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Yamashita I., Fukui S. 1985; Transcriptional control of the sporulation specific glucoamylase gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molecular and Cellular Biology 5:3069–3073
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-1-203
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-135-1-203
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error