1887

Abstract

The ability of micro-organisms to grow on carbon disulphide (CS) as a sole source of carbon and energy appears to be very limited: none was obtained from enrichment culture and eight species could not use it. strain TK-m could grow autotrophically on either CS or carbonyl sulphide (COS) as sole substrates. Growth yield on CS was 7·9 ± 0·9 g cell-carbon (mol CS), and yields on COS, thiosulphate or thiocyanate were in the range 5·6–6·1. COS was detected as an intermediate during growth on CS, and there was quantitative conversion of the sulphur of CS to sulphate during growth. Aerobic oxidation of CS by suspensions of strain TK-m exhibited a of 16·5 μ and a of 524 nmol O consumed min (mg organism-protein). When incubated anaerobically with CS, strain TK-m sequentially produced COS and HS. CS oxidation is proposed to proceed by its sequential hydrolytic cleavage to COS then HS, with release of all the carbon as CO, followed by oxidation of the sulphide to sulphate. This oxidation provides all the energy for growth, which is dependent on the autotrophic fixation of CO, apparently by means of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-134-11-3041
1988-11-01
2022-01-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/134/11/mic-134-11-3041.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-134-11-3041&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Ashworth J., Briggs G.G., Evans A.A., Matula J. 1977; Inhibition of nitrification by nitrapyrin, carbon disulphide and trithiocarbonate.. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 28:673–683
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bremner J.M., Steele C.G. 1978; Role of microorganisms in the atmospheric sulfur cycle.. Advances in Microbial Ecology 2:155–201
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Butler R.G., Rothschild B., Keller J.R. 1969; Metabolism of carbon disulfide by Thiobacillus thiooxidans.. Bacteriological Proceedings 64:
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Chengelis C.P., Neal R.A. 1987; Oxidative metabolism of carbon disulfide by isolated rat liver hepatocytes and microsomes.. Biochemical Pharmacology 36:363–368
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Kanagawa T., Kelly D.P. 1986; Breakdown of dimethyl sulphide by mixed cultures and by Thiobacillus thioparus.. FEMS Microbiology Letters 34:13–19
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kanagawa T., Dazai M., Fukuoka S. 1982; Degradation of O,O-dimethyl phosphorodithioate by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-1 and Pseudomonas AK-2.. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 46:2571–2578
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kelly D.P. 1982; Biochemistry of the chemolithotrophic oxidation of inorganic sulphur.. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B298:499–528
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Kelly D.P., Wood A.P. 1982; Autotrophic growth of Thiobacillus A2 on methanol.. FEMS Microbiology Letters 15:229–233
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kelly D.P., Chambers L.A., Trudinger P.A. 1969; Cyanolysis and spectrophotometric estimation of trithionate in mixture with thiosulfate and tetrathionate.. Analytical Chemistry 41:898–901
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Khalil M.A., Rasmussen R.A. 1984; Global sources, lifetimes and mass balances of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide in the earth’s atmosphere.. Atmospheric Environment 18:1805–1813
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Leadbeater L., Siebert K., Schobert P., Bowien B. 1982; Relationship between activities and protein levels of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase in Alcaligenes faecalis.. FEMS Microbiology Letters 14:263–266
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Rajagopal B.S., Daniels L. 1986; Investigation of mercaptans, organic sulfides, and inorganic sulfur compounds as sulfur sources for the growth of methanogenic bacteria.. Current Microbiology 14:137–144
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Smith N.A., Kelly D.P. 1988; Isolation and physiological characterization of autotrophic sulphur bacteria oxidizing dimethyl disulphide as sole source of energy.. Journal of General Microbiology 134:1407–1417
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Steudler P.A., Peterson B.I. 1984; Contribution of gaseous sulphur from salt marshes to the global sulphur cycle.. Nature; London: 311455–457
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Stoiber R.E., Leggett D.C., Jenkins T.F., Murrmann R.P., Rose W.I. 1971; Organic compounds in volcanic gas from Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala.. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America 82:2299–2302
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Stotzky C., Schenk S. 1976; Volatile organic compounds and microorganisms.. CRC Critical Reviews in Microbiology 4:353–371
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Sweetnam P.M., Taylor S.W.C., Elwood P.C. 1987; Exposure to carbon disulphide and ischaemic heart disease in a viscose rayon factory.. British Journal of Industrial Medicine 44:220–227
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Tuovinen O.H., Kelly D.P. 1973; Studies on the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.. Archiv für Mikrobiologie 88:285–298
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Whitfield F.B., Shea S.R., Gillen K.J., Shaw K.J. 1981; Volatile components from the roots of Acacia pulchella R. Br. and their effect on Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands.. Australian Journal of Botany 29:195–208
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-134-11-3041
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-134-11-3041
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error