1887

Abstract

As a model system for analysing interactions between chlamydiae and myeloid cells and their precursors, we have studied binding, ingestion and destruction of (L serovar) by the human promyelocytic cell line HL-60. HL-60 cells were induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) to differentiate along either the macrophage or the granulocyte pathway, respectively. Using an immunofluorescence assay and electron microscopy, we have shown that induced (differentiated) HL-60 cells, but not uninduced (undifferentiated) HL-60 or other cell lines treated with PMA or DMSO, exhibit increased binding, ingestion and elimination of ; these activities are associated with specific histochemical and antigenic markers of myeloid differentiation. These results suggest that myeloid cells acquire the ability to interact with and kill chlamydiae during cell development.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-4-899
1987-04-01
2022-01-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/133/4/mic-133-4-899.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-4-899&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bard J., Levitt D. 1984; Chlamydia trachomatisstimulates human peripheral blood B lymphocytes to proliferate and secrete polyclonal immunoglobulins in vitro. . Infection and Immunity 43:84–92
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bard J., Levitt D. 1985; Binding, ingestion and multiplication of Chlamydia trachomatis (L2 serovar) in human leukocyte cell lines. Infection and Immunity 50:935–937
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bard J., Levitt D. 1986; Chlamydia trachomatisbinds to distinct subpopulations of human peripheral blood leukocytes. Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology 38:50–60
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bell T. A. 1985; Chlaymdia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum infections in infants. Seminars in Perinatology 9:29–37
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Benedict A. A., McFarland C. 1958; Growth of meningopneumonitis virus in normal and immune guinea pig monocytes. Nature London: 181:174–21743
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Brunham R. C., Kuo C.-C., Chen W.-J. 1985; Systemic Chlamydia trachomatis infection in mice: a comparison of lymphogranuloma venereum and trachoma biovars. Infection and Immunity 48:78–82
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Byrne G. I. 1978; Kinetics of phagocytosis of Chlamydia psittaci by mouse fibroblasts (L cells): separation of the attachment and ingestion stages. Infection and Immunity 19:607–612
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Byrne G. I., Kreuger D. A. 1983; Lymphokine-mediated inhibition of Chlamydia replication in mouse fibroblasts is neutralized by anti-gamma interferon immunoglobulin. Infection and Immunity 42:1152–1158
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Chen T. R. 1977; In situ detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures by fluorescent Hoechst 33258 stain. Experimental Cell Research 104:155–262
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Cleary R. E., Jones R. B. 1985; Recovery of Chlamydia trachomatis from the endometrium in infertile women with serum antichlamydial antibodies. Fertility and Sterility 44:233–235
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Collins S. J., Ruscetti F. W., Gallagher R. E., Gallo R. C. 1978; Terminal differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells induced by dimethyl sulfoxide and other polar compounds. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 75:2458–2462
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Croy T. R., Kuo C.-C., Wang S.-P. 1975; Comparative susceptibility of eleven mammalian cell lines to infection with trachoma organisms. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 1:434–439
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Dawson C. R. 1982; Review of eye infections with Chlamydia trachomatis. . In Chlamydial Infections, pp 71–81 Mardh P. Edited by Amsterdam: Elsevier Biomedical Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  14. DeLamaza L. M., Goebel J. M., Czarniecki C. W., Peterson E. M. 1984; Ultrastructural analysis of the growth cycle of Chlamydia trachomatis in mouse cells treated with recombinant human alpha-interferons. Experimental and Molecular Pathology 41:227–235
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Gabig T. G., Baboir B. M. 1981; The killing of pathogens by phagocytes. Annual Review of Medicine 32:313–326
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Grayston J. T., Kuo C.-C., Wang S.-P., Altman J. 1986; A new Chlamydia psittaci strain, TWAR, isolated in acute respiratory tract infections. New England Journal of Medicine 315:161–168
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Griffin J. D., Ritz J., Nadler L. M., Schloss-Man S. F. 1981; Expression of myeloid differentiation antigens on normal and malignant myeloid cells. Journal of Clinical Investigation 68:932–941
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Kuo C.-C. 1978; Cultures of Chlamydia trachomatisin mouse peritoneal macrophages: factors affecting organism growth. Infection and Immunity 20:439–445
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Kuo C.-C. 1979; Interactions of Chlamydia trachomatis and mouse peritoneal macrophages. In Microbiology-1979, pp 116–119 Schles-singer. D. Edited by Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology;
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Lammont H. C., Nichols R. L. 1981; Immunology of chlamydial infections. In Immunology of Human Infection, pp 441–474 Nahmias A. J., O’Reilly J. Edited by New York: Plenum;
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Levitt D., Zable B., Bard J. 1986; Binding, ingestion and growth of Chlamydia trachomatis (L2serovar) analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytometry 7:378–383
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Matsuyama M., Hinuma Y., Watanabe Y., Kawade Y. 1982; Production of interferon-beta by human lymphoblastoid cells of T and non-T-non- B lineage. Journal of Genetics and Virology 60:191–194
    [Google Scholar]
  23. May W. S., Jacobs S., Cautrecasus P. 1984; Association of phorbol ester-induced hyperphosphorylation and reversible regulation of transferring membrane receptors in HL-60 cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 81:2016–2020
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Moulder J. W., Hatch T. P., Kuo C.-C., Schachter J., Storz J. 1984; Genus I.Chlamydia. . In Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, 1 pp 729–739 Kreig N. R. Edited by Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins;
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Murray H. W., Byrne G. I., Rothermel C. D., Cartelli D. M. 1983; Lymphokine enhances oxygen-independent activity against intracellular pathogens. Journal of Experimental Medicine 158:234–239
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Newburger P. E., Chovaniec M. E., Green-Berger J. S., Cohen H. J. 1979; Functional changes in human leukemic cell line HL-60. A model for myeloid differentiation. Journal of Cell Biology 82:315–322
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Rank R. G., Hough A. J., Jacobs R. F., Cohen C., Barron A. L. 1985; Chlamydial pneumonitis induced in newborn guinea pigs. Infection and Immunity 48:153–158
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Reeve P., Taverne J. 1962; A simple method for total particle counts of trachoma and inclusion blennorrhoea viruses. Nature London: 195:923
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Rothermel C. D., Byrne G. I., Havell E. A. 1983a; Effect of interferon on the growth of Chlamydia trachomatis in mouse fibroblasts (L cells). Infection and Immunity 39:362–370
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Rothermel C. D., Rubin B. Y., Murray H. W. 1983; γ-Interferon is the factor in lymphokine that activates human macrophages to inhibit intracellular Chlamydia psittaci replication. Journal of Immunology 131:2542–2544
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Rovera G., Santoli D., Damsky C. 1979; Human promyelocytic leukemia cells in culture differentiate into macrophage-like cells when treated with a phorbol diester. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 76:2779–2783
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Rovera G., Ferrero D., Pagliardi G. L., Varti-Kar J., Passano S., Bottero L., Abraham S., Lebman D. 1982; Induction of differentiation of human myeloid leukemias by phorbol diesters: phenotypic changes and mode of action. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 397:211–220
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Schachter J. 1978; Chlamydial infections. New England Journal of Medicine 298:428–435490–495540549
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Stephens R. S., Tam M. R., Kuo C.-C., Nowinski R. C. 1982; Monoclonal antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis : antibody specificities and antigen characterization. Journal of Immunology 128:1083–1089
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Storz J., Spears P. 1977; Chlamydiales: properties, cycle of development and effect on eukaryotic host cells. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology 76:167–214
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Thompson S. F., Washington A. E. 1983; Epidemiology of sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis. . Epidemiologic Reviews 5:96–123
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Yong E. C., Klebanoff S. J., Kuo C.-C. 1982; Toxic effect of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes on Chlamydia trachomatis. . Infection and Immunity 37:422–426
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Yong E. C., Chi E. Y., Chen W.-J., Kuo C.-C. 1986; Degradation of Chlamydia trachomatis in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: an ultrastructural study of peroxidase-positive phagolysosomes. Infection and Immunity 53:427–431
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Zvillich M., Sarov I. 1985; Interaction between human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies: electron microscopy and chemiluminescent response. Journal of General Microbiology 131:2627–2635
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-4-899
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-4-899
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error