1887

Abstract

The anaerobic thermophile produced thermostable α-amylase, pullulanase and α-glucosidase activities during growth on starch, pullulan, dextrin or maltose. Synthesis of α-amylase and pullulanase was partially repressed by glucose, whereas α-glucosidase synthesis was not. Fructose completely repressed the synthesis of α-amylase and pullulanase but only partially that of α-glucosidase. α-Amylase and pullulanase activities were predominantly located extracellularly. However, during growth on low amounts of soluble starches (2%, w/v) virtually all activity was cell-associated. Under most conditions examined 75% or more of the α-glucosidase activity was cell-bound. The combined action of these activities produced glucose as the final end-product from amylose and pullulan digestions.

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1987-04-01
2021-08-02
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