1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Bacterial adhesion to cellulose was measured for 13 cellulolytic and 10 non-cellulolytic, xylan-utilizing strains of the ruminal bacterium . Radiolabelled bacteria adhering to Whatman CF11 cellulose powder were determined. Adhesion of the cellulolytic strains ranged from 0 to 49% of the added bacteria. Of the non-cellulolytic strains, 9 showed < 1% adhesion, while one strain gave 5% adhesion. For the cellulolytic strains filter paper solubilization ranged from 24 to 100%, while solubilization of CF11 cellulose varied from 0 to 20%. Both cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic strains produced carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) activity. SDS-PAGE of cell extracts followed by incubation with a gel overlay containing CMC or xylan produced a zymogram of hydrolytic enzyme activity. The cellulolytic strains showed a number of bands of CMCase and xylanase activity. Non-cellulolytic strains possessed fewer bands of activity towards both CMC and xylan. Certain of the enzymes appeared to possess both CMCase and xylanase activity. Bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity was also measured, but no correlation was found between hydrophobicity and adhesion to cellulose.

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1987-04-01
2021-10-17
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