1887

Abstract

The susceptibility of inbred strains of mice to infection by phase I , the aetiological agent of Q fever, was investigated by evaluating morbidity, mortality, antibody production and proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes. Among the 47 strains of mice tested for morbidity and mortality to infection, 33 were resistant, 10 were of intermediate sensitivity, and four were sensitive. A/J mice exhibited the highest mortality, and surviving mice of this strain yielded high concentrations of viable rickettsiae from essentially all organs for more than 3 weeks after inoculation. However, A/J mice developed a protective immune response after vaccination with inactivated cells. Induction of gross pathological responses and antibody production were similar in sensitive mice (strain A/J) and resistant mice (strain C57BL/6J). The LD of phase I for A/J mice was about 1000-fold lower than that for the more resistant C57BL/6J mice. Mice of both strains developed antibody titres against phase I cells, phase II cells, and phase I lipopolysaccharide after the injection of one or more viable phase I organisms of ; five or more rickettsiae caused splenomegaly that was almost proportional to the infecting dose. Suppression of proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes to concanavalin A, a T-cell mitogen, was apparent after infection of sensitive A/J mice with as few as one to five phase I micro-organisms. However, suppression of proliferation of splenic lymphocytes from resistant C57BL/6J mice required 10 phase I .

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-3-691
1987-03-01
2021-08-03
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/133/3/mic-133-3-691.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-3-691&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Anderson G.W. Jr Osterman J.V. 1980; Host defense in experimental rickettsial pox: genetics of natural resistance to infection. Infection and Immunity 28:132–136
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Baca O.G., Akporiaye E.T., Rowatt J.D. 1984; Possible biochemical adaptations of Coxiella burnetii for survival within phagocytes: effect of antibody. In Microbiology - 1984 pp 269–272 Leive L., Schlessinger D. Edited by Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Boraschi D., Meltzer M.S. 1979; Defective tumoricidal capacity of macrophages from A/J mice. II. Comparison of the macrophage cytotoxic defect of A/J mice with that of lipid A-unresponsive C3H/HeJ mice. Journal of Immunology 122:1592–1597
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cerquetti M.C., Sordelli D.O., Ortegon R.A., Bellanti J.A. 1983; Impaired lung defenses against Staphylococcus aureus in mice with hereditary deficiency of the fifth component of complement. Infection and Immunity 41:1072–1076
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Cheers C., Mckenzie I.F.C. 1978; Resistance and susceptibility of mice to bacterial infection: genetics of listeriosis. Infection and Immunity 19:755–762
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Damrow T.A., Williams J.C., Waag D.M. 1985; Suppression of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in C57BL/10 ScN mice vaccinated with phase I Coxiella burnetii.. Infection and Immunity 47:149–156
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Derrick E.H. 1937; ‘Q’ fever, a new fever entity: clinical features, diagnosis, and laboratory investigations. Medical Journal of Australia 2:281–299
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Gervais F., Stevenson M., Skamene E. 1984; Genetic control of resistance to Listeria monocytogenes: regulation of leukocyte inflammatory responses by the He locus. Journal of Immunology 132:2078–2083
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Groves M.G., Osterman J.V. 1978; Host defenses in experimental scrub typhus: genetics of natural resistance to infection. Infection and Immunity 19:583–588
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Groves M.G., Rosenstreich D.L., Taylor B.A., Osterman J.V. 1980; Host defenses in experimental scrub typhus: mapping the gene that controls natural resistance in mice. Journal of Immunology 125:1395–1399
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Hackstadt T., Williams J.C. 1981; Biochemical stratagem for obligate parasitism of eukaryotic cells by Coxiella burnetii.. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 78:3240–3244
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kishimoto R.A., Johnson J.W., Kenyon R.H., Ascher M.S., Larson E.W., Pederson C.E. 1978; Cell-mediated immune responses of guinea pigs to an inactivated phase I Coxiella burnetii vaccine. Infection and Immunity 19:194–198
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Koster F.T., Williams J.C., Goodwin J.S. 1985a; Cellular immunity in Q fever: specific lymphocyte unresponsiveness in Q fever endocarditis. Journal of Infectious Diseases 152:1283–1289
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Koster F.T., Williams J.C., Goodwin J.S. 1985b; Cellular immunity in Q fever: modulation of responsiveness by a suppressor T-cell-monocyte circuit. Journal of Immunology 135:1067–1072
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Lopez C. 1975; Genetics of natural resistance to herpes virus infections in mice. Nature, London 258:152–155
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Moore G.E., Gerner R.F. 1967; Culture of normal human leukocytes. Journal of the American Medical Association 199:519–524
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Ormsbee R.A. 1965; Q fever rickettsiae. In Viral and Rickettsial Infections of Man, 4th edn pp 1144–1160 Horsfall L. F., Tamm I. Edited by Philadelphia: Lippincott;
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ormsbee R., Peacock M., Gerloff R., Tallent G., Wike D. 1978; Limits of rickettsial infectivity. Infection and Immunity 19:239–245
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Paretsky D., Downs C.M., Salman C.W. 1964; Some biochemical changes in the guinea pig during infection with Coxiella burnetii.. Journal of Bacteriology 88:137–142
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Philip R.N., Casper E.A. 1978; Serotyping spotted fever-group rickettsiae with mouse antisera by microimmunofluorescence. A preliminary report. In Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Rickettsiae and Rickettsial Diseases pp 307–311 Kazar J., Ormsbee R. A., Tarasevich I. N. Edited by Bratislava, Czechoslovakia: VEDA;
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Plant J., Glynn A.A. 1976; Genetics of resistance to infection with Salmonella typhimurium in mice. Journal of Infectious Diseases 133:72–78
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Rosenstreich D.L., Weinblatt A.C., O’Brien A.D. 1982; Genetic control of resistance to infection in mice. CRC Critical Reviews in Immunology 3:263–330
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Skamene E., Kongshavn P.A.L., Sachs D.H. 1979; Resistance to Listeria monocytogenes in mice: genetic control by genes that are not linked to the H-2 complex. Journal of Infectious Diseases 139:228–231
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Spicer D.S., Desanctis A.N. 1976; Preparation of phase I Q fever antigen suitable for vaccine use. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 32:85–88
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Thompson W.R. 1947; Use of moving averages and interpolation to estimate median effective dose. I. Fundamental formulas, estimation of error, and relation to other methods. Bacteriological Reviews 11:115–145
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Turco J., Thompson H.A., Winkler H.H. 1984; Interferon-y inhibits growth of Coxiella burnetii in mouse fibroblasts. Infection and Immunity 45:781–783
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Williams J.C., Cantrell J.L. 1981; Biological and immunological properties of Coxiella burnetii vaccines in C57BL/10ScN endotoxin-nonresponder mice. Infection and Immunity 35:1091–1102
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Williams J.C., Thomas L.A., Peacock M.G. 1986; Identification of phase-specific antigenic fractions of Coxiella burnetii by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 24:929–934
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-3-691
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-3-691
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error