1887

Abstract

The electrophoretic karyotypes of five isolates and of five other Candida species have been determined, using orthogonal field alternating gel electrophoresis (OFAGE). None of the isolates had the same electrophoretic karyotype. By comparing all five strains, we arrived at a chromosome number of nine to ten, but since the organism is diploid, we cannot distinguish genetically different chromosomes from homologues which resolve. We determined minimal chromosome numbers of 9 for , 10 for and 6 for

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-133-2-425
1987-02-01
2022-01-25
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