1887

Abstract

Summary: Several strains of propane-utilizing bacteria were isolated from samples of pond and river water. They could be classified into three groups according to their ability to grow on acetone, and a representative strain from each group was selected for detailed study. All three strains belonged to the genus Strain B3aP could not grow on acetone and could not oxidize acetone after growth on propane. Strain PrIO3 grew slowly on acetone but could not oxidize acetone after growth on propane. Both strains excreted acetone during growth on propane. Simultaneous adaptation experiments demonstrated that, whilst propane was oxidized to both propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol, only propan-1-ol was metabolized completely suggesting that only the terminal oxidation pathway was involved in propane dissimilation. The third strain, B2, grew rapidly on acetone and was induced for acetone oxidation after growth on propane, suggesting that both propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol were produced and metabolized completely since no products of propane oxidation could be detected in culture supernatants. We compare these findings with previous reports concerning pathways of propane oxidation.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-9-2453
1986-09-01
2021-10-27
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