1887

Abstract

Summary: Yeast and mycelial forms of ATCC 10231, growing together in 12 h and in 96 h cultures, were separated and their lipids were extracted and characterized. The total lipid content of the yeast forms was always lower than that of the mycelial forms. In 12 h cultures the lipids from the two morphological forms consisted mainly of polar compounds, viz. phospholipids and glycolipids. In 96 h cultures both the yeast and mycelial forms accumulated substantial amounts of apolar compounds, mainly steryl esters and triacylglycerols. The mycelial forms were more active than the yeast forms in this respect. Major differences in the lipid composition between the two morphological forms involved the contents of sterols and complex lipids that contain sterols. As a rule, the yeast lipids contained much larger proportions of free sterols than the mycelial lipids. However, the mycelial lipids contained several times more sterols than the yeast forms but bound as steryl glycosides, esterified steryl glycosides and steryl esters. Steryl glycosides and esterified steryl glycosides occurred in yeast lipids only in traces, if at all. The major steryl glycoside in the mycelial forms was unequivocally identified as cholesteryl mannoside. At both phases of growth the apolar and polar lipid fractions from the mycelial forms contained higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (18:2 and 18:3) but lower levels of oleic acid (18:1) than the corresponding fractions from the yeast forms. The lipid content and composition of 12 h and 96 h yeast and mycelial forms of KCCC 14172, a clinical isolate, were almost identical with those of ATCC 10231.

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1986-08-01
2021-10-20
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