1887

Abstract

Summary: Stationary phase cells of can form either a bud or a hypha, depending upon the pH of the medium into which they are released. At low pH, cells form an ellipsoidal bud and at high pH, cells form an elongated hypha. By staining cells with rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin, we have compared the dynamics of actin localization during the formation of buds and hyphae. Before evagination, actin granules were distributed throughout the cytoplasmic cortex in both budding and hypha-forming cells. Just before evagination, actin granules clustered at the site of evagination, then filled the early evagination in both budding and hypha-forming cells. With continued bud growth, the actin granules then redistributed throughout the cytoplasmic cortex. In marked contrast, with continued hyphal growth, the majority of actin granules clustered at the hyphal apex. This distinct difference in actin granule localization may be related to the distinct differences in the expansion zones of the cell wall recently demonstrated between growing buds and hyphae. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the large neck actin granules and of actin fibres are also described.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-7-2035
1986-07-01
2021-10-27
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