1887

Abstract

Summary: One non-xerophilic fungus, , and four xerophilic fungi, and , were grown at six different water activities ( ) on media containing various concentrations of sodium chloride. Each species was sampled as soon as visible growth appeared and up to six times thereafter during various stages of the growth cycle. The fungal mycelium was extracted and assayed for glycerol using a specific enzymic method. At the highest , 0.997, only small amounts of glycerol were present in the fungi. At lower values, glycerol concentrations rose rapidly at first, then declined as the cultures aged. There appeared to be a correlation between the amount of glycerol accumulated, and the complexity of the spore-bearing structures. Glycerol depletion appeared to be related to the formation of spores and their maturation.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-2-269
1986-02-01
2022-01-22
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