1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: The lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from four isolates of were examined. One isolate was virulent and capsulate, and it produced extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). Three were avirulent, of which one was capsulate and produced EPS; the remainder were non-capsulate and did not produce EPS. LPS was recovered from the cells and from the culture medium. Material extracted from the cells using phenol-water was indistinguishable from LPS extracted with phenol-chloroform-light petroleum. Acid hydrolysis released lipid A which contained in all cases glucosamine, phosphate and the fatty acids 12:0, 14:0 and 3-OH 14:0. The carbohydrate released by mild acid hydrolysis was resolved by gel permeation chromatography into three components: I, a partially included species identified as core substituted with a short sidechain of fucose, galactose and glucose; II, an unsubstituted core oligosaccharide containing heptose, glucose, uronic acid, amino compounds and 3-deoxy-2-octulosonic acid (KDO); III; a totally-included low fraction containing KDO, phosphate and amino compounds. The sidechain component was missing from LPS of one of the non-capsulate strains that did not produce EPS. This strain is believed to lack UDP-glucose-4-epimerase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of galactose. Galactose (with glucose and uronic acid) is known also to be a component of EPS. Defects in galactose synthesis may therefore affect the assembly of LPS as well as EPS.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-11-3159
1986-11-01
2021-10-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/132/11/mic-132-11-3159.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-11-3159&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Albersheim P., Nevins D. J., English P. D., Karr A. 1967; A method for the analysis of sugars in plant cell-wall polysaccharides by gas-liquid chromatography. Carbohydrate Research 5:340–245
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Ayers A. R., Ayers S. B., Goodman R. N. 1979; Extracellular polysaccharide of Erwinia amylovora: a correlation with virulence. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 38:659–266
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bauchop T., Elsden S. R. 1960; The growth of microorganisms in relation to their energy supply. Journal of General Microbiology 23:457–269
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Beer S. V., Sjulin T. M., Aldwinckle H. S. 1983; Amylovorin-induced shoot wilting: lack of correlation with susceptibility to Erwinia amylovora. Phytopathology 73:1328–2333
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bennett R. A. 1980; Evidence for the two virulence determinants in the fireblight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Journal of General Microbiology 116:351–356
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Bennett R. A., Billing E. 1980; Origin of the polysaccharide component of ooze from plants infected with Erwinia amylovora. Journal of General Microbiology 116:341–249
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Billing E. 1984; Studies on avirulent strains of Erwinia amylovora. Acta horticulturae 151:249–253
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Blumenkrantz N., Asboe-Hansen G. 1973; New methods for the quantitative determination of uronic acids. Analytical Biochemistry 54:484–287
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Brade H., Galanos C. 1982; Isolation, purification and chemical analysis of the lipopolysaccharide and lipid A of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCTC 10305. European Journal of Biochemistry 122:233–237
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Bradshaw-Rouse J. J., Whatley M. H., Coplin D. L., Woods A., Sequeira L., Kelman A. 1981; Agglutination of Erwinia stewartii strains with a corn agglutinin: correlation with extracellular polysaccharide production and pathogenicity. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 42:344–250
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Bradshaw-Rouse J. J., Sequeira L., Kelman A. 1982; Sugar composition of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Erwinia chrysanthemi. Phytopathology 72:1134
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Carlson R. W. 1982; Surface chemistry. In Nitrogen Fixation, vol. 2, Rhizobium pp. 199–234 Edited by Broughton J. W. Oxford: Clarendon;
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Carlson R. W., Sanders R. E., Napoli C., Albersheim P. 1978; Host-symbiont interactions. Ill: Purification and partial characterization of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharides. Plant Physiology 62:912–217
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Chatterjee A. K., Buss R. F., Starr M. P. 1977; Unusual susceptibility of Erwinia amylovora to antibacterial agents in relation to the barrier function of its cell envelope. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 11:897–205
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Chester I. R., Meadow P. M. 1975; Heterogeneity of the lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. European Journal of Biochemistry 58:273–282
    [Google Scholar]
  16. De Boer S., H„ Bradshaw-Rouse J. J., Sequeira L., McNaughton M. E. 1985; Sugar composition and serological specificity of Erwinia carotovora lipopolysaccharides. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 31:583–286
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Galanos C., Luderitz O., Westphal O. 1969; A new method for the extraction of R-lipopolysacchar-ides. European Journal of Biochemistry 9:245–249
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Goodman R. N. 1983; Fireblight a case study. In Biochemical Plant Pathology pp. 45–23 Edited by Callow J. A. Chichester: John Wiley;
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Goodman R. N., Huang J. S., Huang P. Y. 1974; Host specific phytotoxic polysaccharides from apple tissue infected with Erwinia amylovora. Science 184:1081–2082
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Knox K., W„ Cullen J., Work E. 1967; An extracellular lipopolysaccharide-phospholipid-pro-tein complex produced by Escherichia coli grown under lysine-limiting conditions. Biochemical Journal 103:192–201
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Luderitz O., Risse H. J., Schulte-Holthausen H., Strominger J. L., Sutherland I. W., West¬phal O. 1965; Biochemical studies of the smooth-rough mutation in Salmonella minnesota. Journal of Bacteriology 89:343–245
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Marsh D. G., Crutchley M. J. 1967; Purification and physico-chemical analysis of fractions from the culture supernatant of Escherichia coli 078K80: free endotoxin and a non-toxic fraction. Journal of General Microbiology 41:405–220
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Quirk A. V., Sletten A., Hignett R. C. 1976; Properties of phage-receptor lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas morsprunorum. Journal of General Microbiology 96:375–281
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Romeiro R., Karr. A. L. Goodman R. N. 1981a; Isolation of a factor from apple that agglutinates Erwinia amylovora. Plant Physiology 68:772–277
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Romeiro R. D., Karr A. L., Goodman R. N. 1981b; Erwinia amylovora cell wall receptor for apple agglutinin. Physiological Plant Pathology 19:383–290
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Slade M. B., Tiffin A. I. 1978; Serological crossreactions between Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia herbicola. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Plant Pathogenic Bacteria (Angers, 1978) pp. 289–293 Angers, France: ISPP/INRA;
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Smith A. R. W., Zamze S. E., Hignett R. C. 1985; Composition of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas syringae pv. morsprunorum and its digestion by bacteriophage A7. Journal of General Microbiology 131:963–274
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Van-Alfen N. K., McMillan B. D. 1982; Macromolecular plant wilting toxins: artifacts of the bioassay method?. Phytopathology 72:132–235
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Westphal O., Jann K. 1965; Bacterial lipopoly¬saccharides: extraction with phenol-water and further applications of the procedure. Methods in Carbohydrate Chemistry 5:83–21
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Wilkinson G. 1977; Composition and structure of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. In Surface Carbohydrates of the Prokaryotic Cell pp. 97–275 Edited by Sutherland I. W. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-11-3159
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-11-3159
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error