1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) raised to intact P-4 cells (serotype ) were used to demonstrate the presence of shared antigenic determinant(s) between BHT (serotype ) cell membranes and human heart tissue. MAb binding to both BHT membrane and human heart tissue was demonstrated by ELISA. Common antigens were identified by immunoblot analysis following separation of BHT membrane components and human heart antigens by SDS-PAGE. MAb 22C4 recognized three polypeptides from the BHT membrane preparation, having molecular masses of 42, 56 and 85 kDa. MAb 22C4 also recognized an 85 kDa component and a 200 kDa component from human heart tissue. MAb D159 was specific for a single 82 kDa polypeptide in BHT membrane, and also bound to two high molecular mass components in human heart (165 and 200 kDa). When both MAb D159 and 22C4 were first absorbed with P-4 cells, subsequent reactivity to the aforementioned BHT membrane components was inhibited, indicating that these cross-reactive components are found in P-4 as well as in BHT micro-organisms. Competitive binding analysis showed that both MAb D159 and MAb 22C4 bound to myosin, indicating that BHT membrane, human heart tissue and myosin share at least one immunodeterminant. This indicates that myosin could be the cross-reactive tissue component in human heart.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-132-10-2885
1986-10-01
2022-01-22
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