1887

Abstract

Summary: O affinities of the bioluminescence systems have been measured in five species of luminous bacteria. He-1a, recently isolated from a fish light-organ, showed halfmaximal bioluminescence at 0·015 µM-O whereas another symbiotic strain (-1a) gave a 33-fold higher value. MJ-1 gave a value of 0·60 µM-O, and the symbiotic LN-la gave half maximal emission at 0·7 µM-O. These results indicate the importance of strain selection for sensitive O measurements.

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1985-09-01
2021-10-24
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