1887

Abstract

Summary: and were grown in continuous culture at a range of dilution rates on a semi-synthetic medium. Dilution rates were chosen to allow the bacteria to grow at the same relative growth rates as compared to their respective μ values. The steady-state levels and production rates of biomass and extracellular enzymes were determined. The lipase and hyaluronate lyase of and the proteolytic activity of and were growth linked enzymes (i.e. they were produced at constant amounts per unit of biomass). In contrast, the lipase, hyaluronate lyase and acid phosphatase of and the lipase of were shown to be non-growth linked enzymes.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-131-7-1619
1985-07-01
2021-10-25
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