1887

Abstract

The quinoxaline chromophores of the antibiotics produced by are derived from tryptophan. Protoplasts of this organism made novel products when they were incubated with -5-fluorotryptophan or -6-fluorotryptophan. When added to batch cultures of the organism. -5-fluorotryptophan. at concentrations as low as 10 μm, inhibited both mycelial growth and triostin production, but gave rise to novel products. These have been characterized, using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, as novel triostins in which one or both of the quinoxaline rings contain an atom of fluorine. The chromatographic properties of the triostins arising from the incorporation of -5-fluorotryptophan are very similar to those of triostins containing chlorine or bromine at position 6 of the quinoxaline ring; they are clearly different from those having a chlorine atom at position 7. Accordingly, it is suggested that the carbon atom at position 5 of the indole ring of tryptophan ends up at position 6 of the quinoxaline ring system in triostins A and C.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-131-3-561
1985-03-01
2021-07-27
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