1887

Abstract

A model of the cell generation cycle of Hasle and Heimdal (Clone 3H) has been produced in which the cell cycle is visualized as being composed of two successive timed periods. The first period is temperature compensated but inversely proportional in duration to the rate of supply of energy (light intensity) whilst the second, culminating in division, has a high but proceeds independently of illumination. Numerical simulations based upon this model and incorporating a feature to encompass variability in individual cell generation times have successfully generated many of the population growth features exhibited by cultures of this species grown under a variety of experimental conditions.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-131-3-411
1985-03-01
2022-01-22
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