1887

Abstract

The acids produced in broth culture by various species of oral haemophili and by stock strains of capsulated and other haemophili were identified and measured by gas-liquid chromatography. Succinic acid was the major acid end-product of all strains, with acetic acid also being regularly produced but in smaller amounts. A stock strain, NCTC 4101, produced less succinic acid than other strains of this species and produced much more oxalacetic and pyruvic acid than all the other strains of haemophili. Strain NCTC 4101 possessed all the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, as previously reported, but in the other haemophili examined only succinic dehydrogenase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase could be detected. No other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were detected and isocitrate lyase, malate synthase and pyruvate carboxylase were also absent. Phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxylase was present in all strains. A partial tricarboxylic acid cycle and marked malate dehydrogenase activity appear to be characteristic of haemophili. The pathway to succinate in haemophili appears to be via carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxalacetate and thence via malate and fumarate. The results of tracer studies on a single oral strain of using various labelled substrates were in keeping with this proposed metabolic pathway.

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1984-07-01
2021-10-16
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