1887

Abstract

Fractionation on sucrose density gradients of spheroplast lysates from NCYC 366 yielded a fraction with a peak density of 1·05 g ml, intermediate between that of membranes and intracellular low-density vesicles. Electron microscopy showed the fraction to consist of membranes associated with intracellular vesicles. Evidence for the presence of plasma membranes in the association fraction was obtained by using I-labelled spheroplasts. The fraction was free from detectable amounts of cytochromes and DNA. Fractionation on sucrose density gradients of incubation mixtures containing isolated crude plasma-membranes and vesicles gave rise to a visible intermediate-density band, which electron microscopy showed to contain membranes associated with vesicles. Evidence for the presence of plasma membranes in the intermediate-density band came from incubating mixtures containing I-labelled crude plasma-membranes, and evidence for the presence of vesicles came from using I-labelled vesicles. Supplementing incubation mixtures with calcium chloride sharply increased the size of the intermediate-density band. Cycloheximide and methylbenzimidazol-2-yl-carbamate had no effect on its formation. Purified plasma-membranes failed to form an intermediate-density band when incubated with vesicles. Supplementing these incubation mixtures with calcium chloride did not produce an intermediate-density band, but caused extensive association of vesicles with plasma membranes that pelleted in gradients. Isolated vesicles were not osmotically active; their polyphosphate content was 1·61 μmol orthophosphate equivalent (mg vesicle protein). They had diameters in the range 0·45-0·65 μm, as measured on electron micrographs of thin sections. The data reported provide further evidence for a role for intracellular low-density vesicles in envelope growth in

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-9-2927
1983-09-01
2021-10-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/129/9/mic-129-9-2927.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-9-2927&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Alterthum F., Rose A. H. 1973; Osmotic lysis of sphaeroplasts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown anaerobically in media containing different unsaturated fatty acids. Journal of General Microbiology 77:371–382
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Byers B., Goetsch L. 1975; Behaviour of spindles and spindle plaques in the cell cycle and conjugation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Journal of Bacteriology 124:511–523
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Cabib E., Roberts R., Bowers B. 1982; Synthesis of the yeast cell wall and its regulation. Annual Review of Biochemistry 51:763–793
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cartledge T. G., Rose A. H., Belk D. M., Goodall A. A. 1977; Isolation and properties of two classes of low-density vesicles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Journal of Bacteriology 132:426–433
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Clausen M. K., Christiansen K., Jensen P. K., Behnke O. 1974; Isolation of lipid particles from baker’s yeast. FEBS Letters 43:176–179
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Dürr M., Urech K., Boller TH., Wiemken A., Schwenchke J., Nagy M. 1979; Sequestration of arginine by polyphosphate in vacuoles of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Archives of Microbiology 121:169–175
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Gratzl M., Schudt C., Ekerdt R., Dahl G. 1980; Fusion of isolated biological membranes. In Membrane Structure and Function 3 pp. 59–92 Bittar E. E. Edited by New : Wiley;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Guilliermond A. 1923; Sur la coloration vitale des chondriosomes. Compte Rendus des séances de la Société de biologie 58:527–529
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Guilliermond A., Mangenot G., Plantefol L. 1933 Tradé de Cytologie Végétale. Paris: Le Francois;
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Herrero P., Moreno F., Gascón S. 1980; Role of vesicles on the transport and secretion of exocellular enzymes by yeast. Cellular and Molecular Biology 26:485–492
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Hoebeke J., Van Nijen G., De Brabander M. 1976; Interaction of oncodazole (R 17924), a new antitumoral drug, with rat brain tubulin. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 69:319–324
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Hossack J. A. 1975 Effects of sterols on lipid composition and plasma membranes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ph.D. thesis University of Bath, U.K.:
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Indge K. J. 1968a; The isolation and properties of the yeast cell vacuole. Journal of General Microbiology 51:441–446
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Indge K. J. 1968b; Polyphosphates of the yeast cell vacuole. Journal of General Microbiology 51:447–455
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Maddy A. H., Spooner R. L. 1970; Ox erythrocyte agglutinability. 1. Variation in the membrane protein. Vox sanguinis 18:34–41
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Marsh B. B. 1959; The estimation of inorganic phosphate in the presence of adenosine triphosphate. Biochimica et biophysica acta 32:357–361
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Matile P., Wiemken A. 1967; The vacuole as the lysosome of the yeast cell. Archiv für Mikrobiologie 56:148–155
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Matile P., Cortat M., Wiemken A., Frey-Wyssling A. 1971; Isolation of Glucanase-Containing particles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 68:636–640
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Novick P., Ferro S., Schekman R. 1981; Order of events in the yeast secretory pathway. Cell 25:461–469
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Papahadjopoulos D., Poste G., Vail W. J. 1979; Studies on membrane fusion with natural and model membranes. In Methods in Membrane Biology 10 pp. 1–121 Korn E. D. Edited by New York & London: Plenum Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Pringle A. T., Forsdyke J., Rose A. H. 1979; Scanning electron microscope study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae spheroplast formation. Journal of Bacteriology 140:289–293
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Quinlan R. A., Pogson C. I., Gull K. 1980; The influence of the microtubule inhibitor, methyl- benzimidazol-2-yl-carbamate (MBC) on nuclear division and the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Journal of Cell Science 46:341–352
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Reynolds E. S. 1963; The use of lead citrate at high pH as an electron-opaque stain in electron microscopy. Journal of Cell Biology 17:208–212
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Rosenberger R. F. 1979; Endogenous lytic enzymes and wall metabolism. In Fungal Walls and Hyphal Growth pp. 265–277 Burnett J. H., Trinci A. P. J. Edited by Cambridge: Cambridge University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Schaffner G., Matile PH. 1981; Structure and composition of baker’s yeast lipid globules. Biochemie und Physiologic der Pflanzen 176:659–666
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Schwencke J. 1977; Characteristics and integration of the yeast vacuole with cellular functions. Physio-logie végétale 15:491–517
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Schwencke J., Derobichon-Szulmajster H. 1976; The transport of S-adenosyl-l-methionine in isolated yeast vacuoles and spheroplasts. European Journal of Biochemistry 65:49–60
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Sentandreu R., Northcote D. H. 1969; The formation of buds in yeast. Journal of General Microbiology 55:393–398
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Setaro F., Morley C. D. G. 1977; A rapid colorimetric assay for DNA. Analytical Biochemistry 81:467–471
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Stewart P. R. 1975; Analytical methods for yeasts. Methods in Cell Biology 12:111–147
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Wickerham L. J. 1951; Taxonomy of yeasts. I. Techniques of classification. United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin1029 Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Agriculture;
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Wiemken A., Dürr M. 1974; Characterization of amino acid pools in the vacuolar compartment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Archives of Microbiology 101:45–57
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Wiemken A., Matile P., Moor H. 1970; Vacuolar dynamics in synchronously budding yeast. Archiv für Mikrobiologie 70:89–103
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-9-2927
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-9-2927
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error