1887

Abstract

The effects of omission of individual amino acids from growth medium on the multiplication of a range of and strains in cycloheximide-treated McCoy cells have been assessed. Differences in requirements were revealed which for strains correlated with clinical syndrome and for with host origin. All 11 strains of examined showed a requirement for addition of histidine to the medium; this was not shown by any of four strains. Among the strains of , three from cases of trachoma, representing serotypes A, B and C, showed a distinctive requirement for the addition of tryptophan to the medium, whilst six strains of oculogenital origin, representing serotypes D-I, exhibited no requirement for tryptophan or methionine; a lymphogranuloma venereum and a ‘fast variant’ strain both showed a requirement for methionine. Of the four strains from different hosts, three showed distinct patterns of amino acid requirements. All chlamydiae squired the addition of valine to medium and the majority required leucine, phenylalanine and also glutamine.

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1983-07-01
2021-10-25
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