1887

Abstract

The effect of omission of individual amino acids from growth medium on the multiplication of (strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis) in cycloheximide-treated McCoy cells has been examined. Marked differences were observed in the amounts of particular amino acids required for normal chlamydial multiplication: omission of either leucine, phenylalanine or valine completely inhibited multiplication, whereas absence of any one of another 10 amino acids had no effect on numbers of cells infected. Threshold concentrations of 80, 80 and approx. 8 nmol ml for leucine, valine and phenylalanine, respectively, were needed for normal chlamydial multiplication. These requirements could not be related either to unusually high content in the whole organism, to degradation in the medium, or, from studies with leucine, to deficient association of leucine with host cells. Leucine deprivation at late stages of the developmental cycle also appeared to regulate multiplication. Possible mechanisms responsible for these effects are discussed.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-7-1991
1983-07-01
2021-07-28
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/129/7/mic-129-7-1991.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-7-1991&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Allan I., Pearce J.H. 1982; Radiolabelling of Chlamydia psittaci (strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis) to high specific activity using 14C-labelled amino acids. FFMS Microbiology Letters 13:69–73
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Allan I., Pearce J.H. 1983; Amino acid requirements of strains of Chlamydia trachomatis and C. psittaci growing in McCoy cells: relationship with clinical syndrome and host origin. Journal of General Microbiology 129:2001–2007
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bablanian R, Esteban M., Baxt B., Sonnabend J.A. 1978; Studies on the mechanisms of vaccinia virus cytopathic effects. 1. Inhibition of protein synthesis in infected cells is associated with virus- induced RNA synthesis. Journal of Central Virology 39:391–402
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bader J.P., Morgan M.D. 1958; Latent viral infection of cells in tissue culture. VI. Role of amino acids, glutamine, and glucose in psittacosis virus propagation in L-cells. Journal of Experimental Medicine 108:617–629
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Griffiths M.S., Ainsworth S., Pearce J.H. 1976; Infectivity titration of guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis agent in irradiated McCoy cells. Journal of General Microbiology 95:249–256
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Hatch T.P. 1975; Competition between Chlamydia psittaci and L-cells for host isoleucine pools: a limiting factor in chlamydial multiplication. Infection and Immunity 12:211–220
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Hatch T.P., Al-Hossainy E., Silverman J.L. 1982; Adenine nucleotide and lysine transport in Chlamydia psittaci. Journal of Bacteriology 150:662–670
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Howard L., Orenstein N.S., King N.W. 1974; Purification on Renograhn density gradients of Chlamydia trachomatis grown in the yolk sac of eggs. Applied Microbiology 27:102–106
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kihlstrom E., Soderlund E. 1981; Endocytosis in mammalian nonprofessional phagocytes, with special reference to the pathogenesis of invasive microorganisms. In Monographs in Allergy pp. 148–170 Edebo L.B., Enerback L., Stendahl O.I. Edited by Basel:: S. Karger.;
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Kuo C.C, Grayston J.T. 1977; Growth of trachoma organisms in HeLa-229 cell cultures. In Nongonococcal Urethritis and Related Infections pp. 328–336 Holmes K.K., Hobson D. Edited by Washington:: American Society for Microbiology.;
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Moulder J.W. 1974; Intracellular parasitism: life in an extreme environment. Journal of Infectious Diseases 130:300–306
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Moulder J.W., Novosel D.L. 1963; Diaminopimelic acid decarboxylase of the agent of meningopneumonitis. ournal of Bacteriology 85:701–706
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Ossowski L., Becker Y., Bernkopf H. 1965; Amino acid requirements of trachoma strains and other agents of the PLT group in cell culture. Israel Journal of Medical Science 1:186–193
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Oxender D.L., Christensen H.N. 1963; Distinct mediating systems for the transport of neutral amino acids by the Ehrlich cell. Journal of Biological Chemistry 238:3686–3699
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Pearce J.H., Allan I., Ainsworth S. 1981; Interaction of chlamydiae with host cells and mucous surfaces. In Adhesion and Microorganism Pathogenicity Ciba Foundation Symposium 80 pp. 234–249 Elliott K., O’Connor M., Whelan J. Edited by London:: Pitman Medical.;
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Piperno J.R., Oxender D.L. 1968; Amino acid transport systems in Escherichia coli K12. Journal of Biological Chemistry 243:5914–5920
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Quay S.C., Oxender D.L. 1980; Regulation of membrane transport. In Biological Regulation and Development 2 pp. 413–436 Goldberger R.F. Edited by New York:: Plenum Press.;
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Reed S.L, Anderson L.E., Jenkin H.M. 1981; Use of cycloheximide to study lipid metabolism of Chlamydia trachomatis cultivated in mouse L-cells grown ir serum-free medium. Infection and Immunity 31:668–673
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Stokes G.V. 1974; Proteinase produced by Chlamydia psittaci in L-cells. Journal of Bacteriology 118:616–620
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Treuhaft M.W., Moulder J.W. 1968; Biosynthesis of arginine in L-cells infected with chlamydiae. Journal of Bacteriology 96:2004–2011
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Van Venrooij W.J., Moonen H., Vanloon-Klassen L. 1974; Source of amino acids used for protein synthesis in HeLa cells. European Journal of Biochemistry 50:297–304
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-7-1991
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-7-1991
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error