1887

Abstract

Leaves of three or four different ages were taken from olive plants quarterly in 1974–1980. One thousand and fifty isolates of pv. from the phylloplane were tested for virulence to the olive and subjected to numerical phenetic analysis using 60 unit characters. The data were analysed using unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) and single linkage clustering on the simple matching ( ) and pattern ( ) coefficients. The isolates obtained from leaves of a given age at a given, time of the year shared higher percentage similarity () values between themselves than with the others. Cluster composition was only marginally affected by different coefficients and methods of clustering. UPGMA analysis on the coefficient recovered 92% of the isolates in 10 major clusters at 75% . Of the isolates from leaves of the same age collected at the same time of the year, 81–99% fell in the same cluster. Conversely, 91–97% of the isolates in five of the major clusters were from leaves of the same type. Of the isolates in the other major clusters, 95–98% were from two different sources but most of the isolates from leaves of one type segregated into discrete subclusters at 85–90% median organisms (HMOs) were constructed to represent all the isolates obtained from the leaves of each type each year. The resulting relationships between the HMOs confirmed those described above for the individual isolates.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-4-901
1983-04-01
2021-10-27
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/129/4/mic-129-4-901.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-4-901&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Armenise V. 1950; Cicli di accrescimento e differenziazione delle gemme in piante perenni nel territorio di Bari. VIII. L’accrescimento di Olea europaea L. negli anni 1948-1949. Nuovo giornale botanico italiano 57:391–417
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bottalico A., Ercolani G. L. 1970; Pseudomonas savastanoi (E. F. Smith) Stevens su ligustro giappo- nese in Puglia. Phytopathologia mediterranea 10:132–135
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Christensen W. B. 1946; Urea decomposition as a means of differentiating Proteus and paracolon organisms from each other and from Salmonella and Shigella types. Journal of Bacteriology 52:461–466
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Comai L., Surico G., Kosuge T. 1982; Relation of plasmid DNA to indoleacetic acid production in different strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv.savastanoi. Journal of General Microbiology 128:2157–2163
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Crosse J. E., Garrett C. M. E. 1963; Studies on the bacteriophagy of Pseudomonas mors-prunorum, Ps. syringae and related organisms. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 26:159–177
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Dye D. W. 1956; Oleander knot (Pseudomonas savastanoi (Erw. F. Smith) Stevens). New Zealand Journal of Science and Technology A 38:407–411
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Dye D. W., Bradbury J. F., Goto M., Hayward A. C., Lelliott R. A., Schroth M. N. 1980; International standards for naming pathovars of phytopathogenic bacteria and a list of pathovar names and pathotype strains. Review of Plant Pathology 59:153–168
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Ercolani G. L. 1970; Presenza epifitica di Pseudomonas savastanoi (E. F. Smith) Stevens sull’olivo, in Puglia. Phytopathologia mediterranea 10:130–132
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ercolani G. L. 1978; Pseudomonas savastanoi and other bacteria colonizing the surface of olive leaves in the field. Journal of General Microbiology 109:245–257
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Ercolani G. L. 1979; Distribuzione di Pseudomonas savastanoi sulle foglie dell’olivo. Phytopathologia mediterranea 18:85–88
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Fry J. C., Humphrey N. C. B., Iles T. C. 1981; Time-series analysis for identifying cyclic components in microbiological data. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 50:189–224
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Goodfellow M., Austin B., Dawson D. 1976; Classification and identification of phylloplane bacteria using numerical taxonomy. In Microbiology of Aerial Plant Surfaces pp. 275–292 Edited by Dickinson C. H., Preece T. F. London & New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Griffiths A. L., Lovitt R. 1980; Use of numerical profiles for studying bacterial diversity. Microbial Ecology 6:35–43
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Gyllenberg H. G. 1963; A general method for deriving determination schemes from random collections of microbial isolates. Annales academiae scientiarum fennicae series A IV, biologica 69:1–23
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Houba C., Remacle J. 1980; Composition of the saprophytic bacterial communities in freshwater systems contaminated by heavy metals. Microbial Ecology 6:55–69
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Janse J. D. 1982; Pseudomonas syringae subsp.savastanoi (ex Smith) subsp. nov., nom. rev., the bacterium causing excrescences onOleaceae andNerium oleander L. International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology 32:166–169
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Klement Z. 1963; Rapid detection of the pathogenicity of phytopathogenic pseudomonads. Nature, London 199:299–300
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Liston J., Wiebe W., Colwell R. R. 1963; Quantitative approach to the study of bacterial species. Journal of Bacteriology 85:1061–1070
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Martin Y. P., Bianchi M. A. 1980; Structure, diversity and catabolic potentialities of aerobic heterotrophic bacterial populations associated with continuous cultures of natural marine phytoplankton. Microbial Ecology 5:265–279
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Mills A. L., Wassel R. A. 1980; Aspects of diversity measurement for microbial communities. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 40:578–586
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Misaghi I., Grogan R. G. 1969; Nutritional and biochemical comparisons of plant-pathogenic and saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads. Phytopathology 59:1436–1450
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Morettini A. 1972 Olivicoltura, 2nd edn.. Rome: Ramo Editoriale degli Agricoltori;
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Oliver J. D., Colwell R. R. 1974; Computer program designed to follow fluctuations in microbial populations and its application to a study of Chesapeake Bay microflora. Applied Microbiology 28:185–192
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Rosswall T., Kvillner E. 1978; Principal- component and factor analysis for the description of microbial populations. Advances in Microbial Ecology 2:1–48
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Sands D. C., Schroth M. N., Hildebrand D. C. 1970; Taxonomy of phytopathogenic pseudomonads. Journal of Bacteriology 101:9–23
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Sierra G. 1957; A simple method for the detection of lipolytic activity of micro-organisms and some observations on the influence of the contact between cells and fatty substrates. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 23:15–22
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Sneath P. H. A. 1968; Vigour and pattern in taxonomy. Journal of General Microbiology 54:1–11
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Sneath P. H. A., Johnson R. 1972; The influence on numerical taxonomic similarities of errors in microbiological tests. Journal of General Microbiology 72:377–392
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Sneath P. H. A., Sokal R. R. 1973 Numerical Taxonomy San Francisco: Freeman;
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Wishart D. 1969; Fortran II programs for 8 methods of cluster analysis (CLUSTAN 1). Kansas Geological Survey Computer Contributions no. 38 pp. 1–112
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-4-901
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-4-901
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error