1887

Abstract

Amino acid utilization by strains and SM-ZK (a streptomycin-bleached mutant) was studied in the presence or absence of ethanol as a carbon source. Among 21 amino acids examined, glutamate was the most effective nutrient for both strains under all conditions. Methionine, cysteine, threonine, leucine and phenylalanine inhibited the growth of on glutamate as the carbon and nitrogen source, but neither glutamate transport nor respiration was inhibited by these amino acids. The growth inhibition by methionine, threonine and phenylalanine were specifically relieved by glycine, valine and tryptophan, respectively.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-128-4-853
1982-04-01
2021-08-04
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