1887

Abstract

The interactions which brought about the invasion of HeLa cells by consisted of a sequence of three phases. Initially, the motility of the bacteria facilitated their contact with the HeLa cells whereupon the bacteria became attached in a reversible manner (i.e. the bacteria could be removed readily by washing the HeLa cell monolayers with Hanks’ Balanced Salt solution). The binding forces responsible for reversible attachment were probably the weak long-range forces of the secondary minimum level of attractive interactions between the bacterium and the HeLa cell. Reversible attachment was a necessary interlude before the bacteria became irreversibly attached to the surfaces of the HeLa cells (i.e. the bacteria were no longer removed by the washing procedure that removed the reversibly attached salmonellae). Irreversible attachment was prevented in solutions of low ionic strength; the forces responsible were probably those of the primary minimum generated between the HeLa cell and a bacterial adhesin which was capable of acting over only short distances between the reversibly attached bacterium and the HeLa cell (i.e. probably less than 15 nm). Only irreversibly attached bacteria proceeded to the third phase and were internalized by the HeLa cells.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-351
1981-12-01
2021-07-31
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/127/2/mic-127-2-351.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-351&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Ambrose E.J. 1966; Electrophoretic behavior of cells. In Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 16 pp. 243–265 Butler J.A.V., Huxley H.E. Edited by Oxford:: Pergamon Press.;
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Brinton C.C. 1965; Structure, function, synthesis and genetic control of bacterial pili and a molecular model for DNA and RNA transport in Gram negative bacteria. Transactions of the New York Academy of Sciences, Series II 27:1003–1054
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Brownlee K.A. 1965 Statistical Theory and Methodology in Science and Engineering. London & New York:: John Wiley.;
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Capo C., Bongrand P., Benoliel A.M., Depieds R. 1978; Dependence of phagocytosis on strengths of phagocyte-particle interaction. Immunology 35:117–182
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Duguid J.P., Anderson E.S., Alfredsson G.A., Barker R., Old D.C. 1975; A new biotyping scheme for Salmonella typhimurium and its phylogenetic significance. Journal of Medical Microbiology 8:149–166
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Fisher H.W., Cooper T.W. 1967; Electron-microscope studies of the microvilli of HeLa cells. Journal of Cell Biology 34:569–576
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Freter R., O’Brien P.C.M., Macsai M.S. 1979; Effect of chemotaxis on the interaction of cholera vibrios with intestinal mucosa. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 32:128–132
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Fuhrman G.F. 1965; Cytopherograms of normal, proliferating and malignant liver cells. In Cell Electrophoresis pp. 92–98 Ambrose E.J. Edited by Boston:: Little, Brown and Co.;
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Giannella R.A., Washington O., Gemski P., Formal S.B. 1973; Invasion of HeLa cells by Salmonella typhimurium: a model for study of invasiveness of salmonella. Journal of Infectious Diseases 128:69–75
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Griffin F.M., Griffin J.A., Leider J.E., Silverstein S.C. 1975; Studies on the mechanism of phagocytosis. I. Requirements for circumferential attachment of particle-bound ligands to specific receptors on the macrophage plasma membrane. Journal of Experimental Medicine 142:1263–1282
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Hale T.L., Bonventre P.F. 1979; Shigella infection of Henle intestinal epithelial cells: role of the bacterium. Infection and Immunity 24:879–886
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Heard D.H., Seaman G.V.F. 1960; The influence of pH and ionic strength on electrokinetic stability of the human erythrocyte membrane. Journal of General Physiology 43:635–654
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Ito S. 1969; Structure and function of the glycocalyx. Federation Proceedings 28:12–25
    [Google Scholar]
  14. James A.M. 1957; The electrochemistry of the bacterial surface. In Progress in Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry 8 pp. 96–142 Butler J.A.V., Katz B. Edited by New York & London:: Pergamon Press.;
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Jones G.W. 1977; The attachment of bacteria to the surfaces of animal cells. In Microbial Interactions. Receptors and Recognition, Series B 3 pp. 139–176 Reissig J.L. Edited by London & New York:: Chapman & Hall.;
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Jones G.W., Freter R. 1976; Adhesive properties of Vibrio cholerae: nature of the interaction with isolated rabbit brush-border membranes and human erythrocytes. Infection and Immunity 14:240–245
    [Google Scholar]
  17. KihlstrÖm E. 1980; Interaction between salmonella bacteria and mammalian non-professional phago-cytes. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 33:2491–2501
    [Google Scholar]
  18. KihlstrÖm E., Edebo L. 1976; Association of viable and inactivated Salmonella typhimurium395MS and MR 10 with HeLa cells. Infection and Immunity 14:851–857
    [Google Scholar]
  19. KihlstrÖm E., Latkovic S. 1978; Ultrastructural studies on the interaction between Salmonella typhimurium 395MS and HeLa cells. Infection and Immunity 22:804–809
    [Google Scholar]
  20. KihlstrÖm E., Nilsson L. 1977; Endocytosis of Salmonella typhimurium 395MS and MR 10 by HeLa cells. Acta pathologica et microbiologica scandinavica B85:322–328
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Lowrie D.B., Aber V.R., Carrol M.E.W. 1979; Division and death rates of Salmonella typhimurium inside macrophages: use of penicillin as a probe. Journal of General Microbiology 110:409–419
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Marshall K.C. 1975; Clay mineralogy in relation to survival of soil bacteria. Annual Review of Phytopathology 13:357–373
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Marshall K.C., Stout R., Mitchell R. 1971; Mechanism of the initial events in the sorption of marine bacteria to surfaces. Journal of General Microbiology 68:337–348
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Nairn R.C. (editor) 1976 Fluorescent Protein Tracing, 4th edn.. Edinburgh & London:: Livingston.;
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Old D.C., Duguid J.P. 1979; Transduction of fimbriation demonstrating common ancestry in FIRN strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Journal of General Microbiology 112:251–259
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Pollack W., Hager H.J., Reckel R., Toren D.A., Singher H.O. 1965; A study of the forces involved in the second stage of haemagglutination. Transfusion 5:158–183
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Pugh-Humphreys R.G.P., Sinclair W. 1970; Ultra-structural studies relating to the surface morphology of cultured cells. Journal of Cell Science 6:477–484
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Sachtleben P., Luyken R. 1962; Veränderungen des elektrokinetischen Potentials von HeLa-Zellen nach Infektion mit Poliomyelitis Virus. Archiv für die gesamte Virusforschung 11:732–742
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Salit I.E., Gotschlich E. 1977; Type 1 Escherichia coli pili: characterization of binding to monkey kidney cells. Journal of Experimental Medicine 146:1182–1194
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Shands J.W. 1965; Localization of somatic antigen on gram-negative bacteria by electron microscopy. Journal of Bacteriology 90:266–270
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Silverstein S.C., Steinman R.M., Cohn Z.A. 1977; Endocytosis. Annual Review of Biochemistry 46:669–722
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Smith M.L., Carski T.R., Griffin C.W. 1962; Modification of fluorescent-antibody procedures employing crystalline tetramethylrhodamineiso-thiocyanate. Journal of Bacteriology 83:1358–1359
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Stossel T.P. 1975; Phagocytosis: recognition and ingestion. Seminars in Hematology 12:83–116
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Sweeney G., Freer J.H. 1979; Location of binding sites on common type 1 fimbriae from Escherichia coli. Journal of General Microbiology 112:321–328
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Takeuchi A. 1967; Electron microscope studies of experimental salmonella infection. I. Penetration into the intestinal epithelium by Salmonella typhimurium. American Journal of Pathology 50:109–136
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Van Oss C.J. 1978; Phagocytosis as a surface phenomenon. Annual Review of Microbiology 32:19–39
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Weiss L., Harlos J.P. 1972; Short-term interactions between cell surfaces. In Progress in Surface Science 1 pp. 355–405 Davison S.G. Edited by Oxford:: Pergamon Press.;
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Wilkins D.J., Ottewill R.H., Bangham A.D. 1962; On the flocculation of sheep leucocytes: II. Stability studies. Journal of Theoretical Biology 2:176–191
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Wilkinson R.G., Gemski P., Stocker B.A.D. 1972; Non-smooth mutants of Salmonella typhimurium: differentiation by phage sensitivity and genetic mapping. Journal of General Microbiology 70:527–554
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-351
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-351
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error