1887

Abstract

A sp. capable of growth on dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl sulphoxide was isolated from aerobic enrichment cultures containing dimethyl sulphoxide as the carbon and energy source. Suspensions of cells taken from a dimethyl sulphoxide-limited chemostat oxidized dimethyl sulphide, methanethiol, formaldehyde, formate and thiosulphate. Enzyme studies indicated that the pathway of dimethyl sulphoxide metabolism involves an initial reduction to dimethyl sulphide, which is subsequently oxidized by an NADH-dependent mono-oxygenase to formaldehyde and methanethiol. Further oxidation of methanethiol is by a hydrogen peroxide-producing oxidase, again resulting in the production of formaldehyde. Extracts of dimethyl sulphoxide-grown cells also contained high levels of catalase as well as NAD-dependent formaldehyde and formate dehydrogenases. The organism probably used the serine pathway for growth on dimethyl sulphoxide. This was indicated by the presence of high activities of hydroxypyruvate reductase in dimethyl sulphoxide-grown cells.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-315
1981-12-01
2021-08-04
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/127/2/mic-127-2-315.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-315&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Ando H., Kumagai M., Karashimada T., Iida H. 1957; Diagnostic use of dimethylsulfoxide reduction test within Enterobacteriaceae. Japanese Journal of Microbiology 1:335–338
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bamforth C.W. 1980; Dimethyl sulphoxide reductase of Saccharomyces spp. FEMS Microbiology Letters 7:55–59
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Banwart W.L., Bremner J.M. 1976; Evolution of volatile sulphur compounds from soils treated with sulphur-containing organic materials. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 8:439–443
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Blackmore M.A., Quayle J.R. 1970; Microbial growth on oxalate by a route not involving glyoxyl-ate carboligase. Biochemical Journal 118:53–59
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bremner J.M., Steele C.C. 1978; Role of micro-organisms in the atmospheric sulphur cycle. Advances in Microbial Ecology 2:155–201
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cox R.A., Sandalls F.J. 1974; The photooxidation of hydrogen sulfide in air. Atmospheric Environments 8:1269–1281
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Dodgson K.S. 1961; Determination of inorganic sulphate in studies on the enzymic and non-enzymic hydrolysis of carbohydrate and other sulphate esters. Biochemical Journal 78:312–319
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Van Dijken J.P., Oostra-Demkes G.J., Otto R., Harder W. 1976; S-Formyl glutathione: the substrate for formate dehydrogenase in methanolutilizing yeasts. Archives of Microbiology 11:77–83
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Harder W., Attwood M.M. 1978; Biology, Physiology and biochemistry of hyphomicrobia. Advances in Microbial Physiology 17:303–359
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Jacob S.W., Herschler R. 1975; Biological actions of dimethyl sulfoxide. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 243:1–480
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Johnson P.A., Jones-Mortimer M.C., Quayle J.R. 1964; Use of a purified bacterial formate dehydrogenase for the micro-estimation of formate. Biochimica et biophysica acta 89:351–353
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kortstee G.J.J. 1980; The homoisocitrate glyoxylate cycle in pink, facultative methylotrophs. FEMS Microbiology Letters 8:59–66
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Lovelock J.E., Maggs R.J., Rasmussen R.A. 1972; Atmospheric dimethyl sulphide and the natural sulphur cycle. Nature London: 237:452–453
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lück H. 1963; Catalase. In Methods of Enzymatic Analysis, 1st. pp. 885–894 Bergmeyer H. Edited by New York & London:: Academic Press.;
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Nash T. 1953; The colorimetric estimation of formaldehyde by means of the Hantzsch reaction. Biochemical Journal 55:416–421
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Rammler D.H., Zaffaroni A. 1967; Biological implications of DMSO based on a review of its chemical properties. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 141:13–23
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Sivelä S. 1980; Dimethyl sulphide as a growth substrate for an obligately chemolithotrophic Thiobacillus. Commentations physico-mathe-maticae dissertationes (Helsinki) 1:1–69
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Sivelä S., Sundman V. 1975; Demonstration of Thiobacillus-type bacteria which utilize methyl sulphides. Archives of Microbiology 103:303–304
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Smale B.C., Lasater N.J., Hunter B.T. 1975; Fate and metabolism of dimethyl sulfoxide in agricultural crops. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 243:118–236
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Vishniac W., Santer M. 1957; The thiobacilli. Bacteriological Reviews 21:195–213
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Wood D.C. 1971; Fate and metabolism of DMSO. In Dimethyl Sulfoxide 1 pp. 133–145 Jacob S.W., Rausenbaum E. E., Wood D.C. Edited by New York:: Marcel Dekker.;
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Yen H.-C., Marrs B. 1977; Growth of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata under anaerobic dark conditions with dimethyl sulfoxide. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 181:411–418
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Zinder S.H., Brock T.D. 1978a; Dimethyl sulphoxide reduction by micro-organisms. Journal of General Microbiology 105:335–342
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Zinder S.H., Brock T.D. 1978b; Dimethyl sulfoxide as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Archives of Microbiology 116:35–40
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-315
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-127-2-315
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error