1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: One hundred soils from various parts of the South Island of New Zealand were cultivated on an acid medium at 37°. Stockyard soils yielded most yeasts by this treatment, principally strains of and . Few yeasts were isolated from rural soils, and very few from urban soils. was recovered from two soils, one from an urban area and one from a stockyard. was not isolated.

The yeast flora which grew at room temperature ( . 18°) of 8 soils was also examined. One of these, a peat soil, yielded a pure culture of . Species of and were dominant in the other seven samples, and their yeast population as a whole was of colourless, capsulated, non-fermenting, starch synthesizing and nitrate utilizing organisms.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-12-1-54
1955-02-01
2021-08-01
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