1887

Abstract

The major polar lipids in cells of NCIB 10472 grown on nutrient agar were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, a glucosyldiacylglycerol, a glucuronosyldiacylglycerol and an ornithine amide lipid. An additional phospholipid, tentatively identified as acyl phosphatidylglycerol or bis-phosphatidic acid, was a trace component of the wall lipids from broth cultures, which lacked the glycolipids and the ornithine amide lipid. The wall lipids from broth cultures of three further strains of (NCIB 10471, NCIB 11156 and NCTC 10737) contained all of the above lipids, and in two cases (strains NCIB 10471, and NCIB 11156) had an unusually high content of free fatty acid. Fatty acid compositions of the extractable lipids were qualitatively similar for all four strains: the major components were iso-pentadecanoic acid, pentadecanoic acid, a -heptadecenoic acid and a -hexadecenoic acid. Anteiso fatty acids were minor components in strain NCIB 10472. Lipid mixtures in which the ornithine amide lipid was present also contained small amounts of -hydroxy fatty acids: in strain NCIB 10472 the major ones were the straight-chain and iso-branched C acids. Lipopolysaccharides from all four strains had similar, complex fatty acid compositions. The major non-hydroxy acids were the straight-chain and iso-branched C acids. -Hydroxy acids common to all strains included the straight-chain C, C, C, C and C acids, together with branched-chain C and C acids probably belonging to the iso series. The lipopolysaccharide from strain NCIB 10472 also contained C and C hydroxy acids of the same series, and small amounts of C and C -hydroxy acids probably belonging to the anteiso series. The close resemblance in both polar lipid and fatty acid compositions between strains of and is further evidence that these species are synonymous. Significant differences between the lipids and fatty acids of and those reported for a strain of do not harmonize with a proposal to transfer the former organism to the genus .

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1980-06-01
2021-08-04
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