1887

Abstract

A species isolated from solar evaporation ponds and sodium sesquicarbonate deposits at Lake Magadi, Kenya, differs from known species of in its GC content, in being obligately alkalophilic with a pH optimum between 9·0 and 10·0, and in having a Mg requirement of between 0·1 and 2·0 m for optimum growth.

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1980-01-01
2021-10-23
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