1887

Abstract

A previous suggestion that sensitivity to -aminocarboxylic acids in is associated with the ability to grow axenically has been re-evaluated using new axenic strains and axenic derivatives of strain 3 recombinant for linkage group II. It is now shown that the major gene for -aminocarboxylic acid sensitivity, designated ., is not allelic to previously described axenic loci and , but that is closely linked to, or allelic with a third axenic gene found in strains 2 and 3. The phenotype is rapid growth in axenic medium. The locus is located on linkage group II. Genetic evidence suggests that the strains 2 and 3 now in existence share a common genetic background and may not represent independent isolates from the wild-type strain 4. Studies with C-labelled -aminocaproic acid show that sensitivity to -aminocarboxylic acids is correlated with increased myxamoebal permeability to these compounds.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-107-2-223
1978-08-01
2021-10-24
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