1887

Abstract

Six strains of of different virulence in guinea-pigs were compared with regard to their resistance to low pH, to hydrogen peroxide (HO) at different pH values and to superoxide(·0−). Low virulence was associated with susceptibility to HO in native and isoniazid-resistant strains but not in laboratory-attenuated strain 37a. HO resistance was only partly related to catalase content. Low virulence was not associated with susceptibility to an acid environment but the tuberculocidal effect of HO was significantly increased at low pH. The strains were uniformly resistant to ·0− and contained similar amounts of superoxide dismutase. The implications of these observations are discussed in the context of mechanisms of host defence in tuberculosis.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-104-1-37
1978-01-01
2021-10-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/104/1/mic-104-1-37.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-104-1-37&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Alsaadi A., Smith D. W. 1973; The fate of virulent and attenuated mycobacteria in guineapigs infected by the respiratory route. American Review of Respiratory Diseases 107:1041–1046
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Babior B. M., Curnutte T. J., Kipnes R. S. 1975; Biological defence mechanisms.Evidence for the participation of superoxide in bacterial killing by xanthine oxidase. Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine 85:235–244
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Blanden R. V., Hapel A. J., Doherty P. C., Zinkernagel R. M. 1976; Lymphocyte-macrophage interactions and macrophage activation in the expression of antimicrobial immunity in vivo. In Immunobiology of the Macrophage pp. 367–400 Nelson D. S. Edited by New York, San Francisco and London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bohnenkamp W., Weser U. 1975; Superoxide dismutase microassay in biological material. Hoppe-Seyler’s Zeitschrift für physiologische Chemie 356:747–754
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Cohn M. L., Waggoner R. F., Mcclatchy J. K. 1968; The 7H11 medium for the cultivation of mycobacteria. American Review of Respiratory Diseases 98:295–296
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cruickshank R., Duguid J. P., Marmion B. P., Swain R. H. A. 1975 Medical Microbiology, 12th edn. 2 p. 262 Edinburgh, London and New York: Churchill Livingstone;
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Darzins E. 1958 Bacteriology of Tuberculosis p. 232 Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Davies O. L. 1967 Design and Analysis of Industrial Experiments, 2nd edn. pp. 321–327 London and Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd;
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Davis B. J. 1964; Disc electrophoresis. II. Methods and application to human serum proteins. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 121:404–427
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Diaz G. A., Wayne L. G. 1974; Isolation and characterisation of catalase produced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. American Review of Respiratory Diseases 110:312–319
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Drath D. B., Karnovsky M. L. 1975; Superoxide production of phagocytic leucocytes. Journal of Experimental Medicine 141:257–262
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Dubos R. J. 1953a; The effect of ketone bodies and other metabolites on the survival and multiplication of staphylococci and tubercle bacilli. Journal of Experimental Medicine 98:145–155
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Dubos R. J. 1953b; Effect of the composition of the gaseous and aqueous environments on the survival of tubercle bacilli in vitro. Journal of Experimental Medicine 97:357–366
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Dubos R. J. 1955; Properties and structures of tubercle bacilli concerned in their pathogenicity. Symposia of the Society for General Microbiology 5:103–125
    [Google Scholar]
  15. East African/British Medical Research Council Investigation 1973; Controlled clinical trial of four short-course (6-month) regimens of chemotherapy for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: second report. Lancet i:1331–1339
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Gayathri Devi B., Shaila M. S., Ramakrishnan T., Gopinathan K. P. 1975; The purification and properties of peroxidase in Mycobacterium tuberculosisH37RV and its possible role in the mechanism of action of isonicotinic acid hydra- zide. Biochemical Journal 149:187–197
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Gee J. B. L., Khandwala A. S. 1976; Oxygen metabolism in the alveolar macrophage: friend or foe ?. Journal of the Reticuloendothelial Society 19:229–236
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Goren M. B., Brokl O., Schaefer W. B. 1974a; Lipids of putative relevance to virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: correlation of virulence with elaboration of sulfatides and strongly acidic lipids. Infection and Immunity 9:142–149
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Goren M. B., Brokl O., Schaefer W. B. 1974b; Lipids of putative relevance to virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: phthiocerol dimycoserosate and the attenuation indicator lipid. Infection and Immunity 9:150–158
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Gregory E. M., Fridovich I. 1974; Visualisation of catalase on acrylamide gels. Analytical Biochemistry 58:57–62
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Hamilton G. A. 1974; Chemical models and mechanisms for oxygenases. In Molecular Mechanisms of Oxygen Activation pp. 405–451 Hayaishi O. Edited by New York and London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Hart P.D’A., Armstrong J. A. 1974; Strain virulence and the lysosomal response in macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection and Immunity 10:742–746
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Jensen K. A., Kiaer I. 1959; Practical principles concerning microscopy, cultivation, resistance determination and classification of mycobacteria. Bulletin of the International Union Against Tuberculosis 29:82–98
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Jensen M. S., Bainton D. F. 1973; Temporal changes in pH within the phagocytic vacuole of the polymorphonuclearneutrophilic leukocyte. Journal of Cell Biology 56:379–388
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Johnston R. B., Keele B. B., Misra H. P., Lehmeyer J. E., Webb L. S., Baehner R. L., Rajagopalan K. V. 1975; The role of superoxide anion generation in phagocytic bactericidal activity: studies with normal and chronic granulomatous disease leukocytes. Journal of Clinical Investigation 55:1357–1372
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Karnovsky M. L., Lazdins J., Drath D., Harper A. 1975; Biochemical characteristics of activated macrophages. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 256:266–274
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Klebanoff S. J. 1965; Inactivation of estrogen by rat uterine preparations. Endocrinology 76:301–311
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Klebanoff S. J. 1975; Antimicrobial mechanisms in neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Seminars in Haematology 12:117–142
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Klebanoff S. J., Hamon C. B. 1975; Antimicrobial systems of mononuclear phagocytes. In Mononuclear Phagocytes in Immunity, Infection and Pathology pp. 507–529 Van Furth R. Edited by Oxford: Blackwell Scientific;
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Leggett Bailey J. 1967 Techniques in Protein Chemistry, 2nd edn. pp. 340–346 Amsterdam, London and New York: Elsevier;
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Mackaness G. B. 1956; The intracellular activation of pyrazinamide and nicotinamide. American Review of Tuberculosis 74:718–728
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Mandell G. L. 1975; Catalase, superoxide dismutase and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus: in vitro and in vivo studies with emphasis on staphylococcal-leukocyte interaction. Journal of Clinical Investigation 55:561–566
    [Google Scholar]
  33. McCune R. M., Feldmann F. M., Lambert H. P., Mcdermott W. 1966; Microbial persistence. 1. The capacity of tubercle bacilli to survive sterilization in mouse tissues. Journal of Experimental Medicine 123:455–468
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Mcdermott W., Tompsett R. 1954; Activation of pyrazinamide and nicotinamide in acidic environments in vitro. American Review of Tuberculosis 70:748–754
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Middlebrook G. 1957; Diagnostic and biological problems of isoniazid-resistant tubercle bacilli. In Proceedings of the 14th International Tuberculosis Conference pp. 71–97 New Delhi: Tuberculosis Association of India;
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Mitchison D. A. 1970; Regional variation in the guinea-pig virulence and other characteristics of tubercle bacilli. Pneumonology 142:131–137
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Mitchison D. A., Wallace J. G., Bhatia A. L., Selkon J. B., Subbatah T. V., Lancaster M. C. 1960; A comparison of the virulence in guinea-pigs of South Indian and British tubercle bacilli. Tubercle 41:1–22
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Mitchison D. A., Bhatia A. L., Rhadakrishna S., Selkon J. B., Subbaiah T. V., Wallace J. G. 1961; The virulence in the guinea-pig of tubercle bacilli isolated before treatment from South Indian patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. 1. Homogeneity of the investigation and a critique of the virulence test. Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 25:285–312
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Mitchison D. A., Selkon J. B., Lloyd J. 1963; Virulence in the guinea-pig, susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, and catalase activity of isoniazid-sensitive tubercle bacilli from South Indian and British patients. Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology 86:377–386
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Narayanan Nair C., Mackay-Scollay E. M., Ramachandran K., Selkon J. B., Tripathy S. P., Mitchison D. A., Dickinson J. M. 1964; Virulence in the guinea-pig and susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide of isoniazid-sensitive tubercle bacilli from South Indian patients. Tubercle 45:345–353
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Peters T. J., Müller M., De Duve C. 1972; Lysosomes of the arterial wall. 1. Isolation and subcellular fractionation of cells from normal rabbit aorta. Journal of Experimental Medicine 136:1117–1139
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Ramakrishnan T., Suryanarayana Murthy P., Gopinathan K. P. 1972; Intermediary metabolism of mycobacteria. Bacteriological Reviews 36:65–108
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Sagone A. L., King G. W., Metz E. N. 1976; A comparison of the metabolic response to phagocytosis in human granulocytes and monocytes. Journal of Clinical Investigation 57:1352–1358
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Salin M. L., Mccord J. M. 1974; Superoxide dismutases in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Journal of Clinical Investigation 54:1005–1009
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Sprick M. G. 1956; Phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis stained with indicator dyes. American Review of Tuberculosis 74:552–565
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Subbaiah T. V., Mitchison D. A., Selkon J. B. 1960; The susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide of Indian and British isoniazid-sensitive and isoniazid-resistant tubercle bacilli. Tubercle 41:323–333
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Weening R. S., Wever R., Roos D. 1975; Quantitative aspects of the production of superoxide radicals by phagocytozing human granulocytes. Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine 85:245–252
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Wietzerbin J., Lederer F., Petit J. F. 1975; Structural study of the poly-L-glutamic acid of the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosisvar. hominis, strain Brevannes. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 62:246–252
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-104-1-37
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-104-1-37
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error