1887

Abstract

Summary

, in doses of 2.·0 × 10 to 3·0 × 10 viable organisms, was injected into athymic nude mice, irradiated mice and mice treated with reticuloendothelial system-blocking agents. Viable counts on liver and spleen homogenates were made at intervals after infection. In both nude mice (nu/nu) and normal littermates (nu/+) of BALB/c background, the bacteria grew rapidly for 24 h but increased only slowly thereafter, to reach a plateau of about 10 per organ at 72 h. In nu/+ mice, the number of viable bacteria began to decrease after 6 to 9 days, with complete elimination by day 12. In nude mice, the number of Listeria remained at a stable level of approximately 10 per organ during the observation period of 21 days. In lethally irradiated nu/+ mice, bacteria grew progressively and extensively to reach 10 per spleen and 10 per liver by 72 h. Bacterial growth during the first 72 h was markedly enhanced by treatment with carbon particles, dextran sulphate 500 or silica. These enhancing effects were also observed in nude mice and in AKR, CH/He and CBL/6 animals. We conclude that both non-immune phagocytes and T cell-dependent mechanisms contribute to the resistance of mice to Listeria infection.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-100-2-373
1977-06-01
2021-08-04
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