1887

Abstract

Most bacteria can form biofilms, which typically have a life cycle from cells initially attaching to a surface before aggregation and growth produces biomass and an extracellular matrix before finally cells disperse. To maximize fitness at each stage of this life cycle and given the different events taking place within a biofilm, temporal regulation of gene expression is essential. We recently described the genes required for optimal fitness over time during biofilm formation in using a massively parallel transposon mutagenesis approach called TraDIS-. We have now repeated this study in serovar Typhimurium to determine the similarities and differences in biofilm formation through time between these species. A core set of pathways involved in biofilm formation in both species included matrix production, nucleotide biosynthesis, flagella assembly and LPS biosynthesis. We also identified several differences between the species, including a divergent impact of the antitoxin TomB on biofilm formation in each species. We observed deletion of to be detrimental throughout the development of the biofilms but increased biofilm biomass in . Typhimurium. We also found a more pronounced role for genes involved in respiration, specifically the electron transport chain, on the fitness of mature biofilms in . Typhimurium than in and this was linked to matrix production. This work deepens understanding of the core requirements for biofilm formation in the Enterobacteriaceae whilst also identifying some genes with specialised roles in biofilm formation in each species.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (Award BB/R012504/1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MarkA. Webber
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-11-03
2024-02-29
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