1887

Abstract

is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and diarrhoeal disease is a major cause of child morbidity, growth faltering and mortality in low- and middle-income countries. Despite evidence of high incidence and differences in disease epidemiology, there is limited genomic data from studies in developing countries. In this study, we aimed to quantify the extent of gene sharing in local and global populations. We characterized the genetic diversity and accessory-genome content of a collection of isolates from the Cairo metropolitan area, Egypt. In total, 112 isolates were collected from broiler carcasses (=31), milk and dairy products (=24), and patients suffering from gastroenteritis (=57). Among the most common sequence types (STs), we identified the globally disseminated host generalist ST-21 clonal complex (CC21) and the poultry specialists CC206, CC464 and CC48. Notably, CC45 and the cattle-specialist CC42 were under-represented, with a total absence of CC61. Core- and accessory-genome sharing was compared among isolates from Egypt and a comparable collection from the UK (Oxford). Lineage-specific accessory-genome sharing was significantly higher among isolates from the same country, particularly CC21, which demonstrated greater local geographical clustering. In contrast, no geographical clustering was noted in either the core or accessory genome of CC828, suggesting a highly admixed population. A greater proportion of isolates were multidrug resistant compared to . Our results suggest that there is more horizontal transfer of accessory genes between strains in Egypt. This has strong implications for controlling the spread of antimicrobial resistance among this important pathogen.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Zewail City of Science and Technology (Award ZC 004-2019)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MohamedElhadidy
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-06-08
2022-06-28
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