1887

Abstract

is a major human pathogen responsible for over 317000 deaths in children <5 years of age with the burden of the disease being highest in low- and middle-income countries including South Africa. Following the introduction of the 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in South Africa in 2009 and 2011, respectively, a decrease in both invasive pneumococcal infections and asymptomatic carriage of vaccine-type pneumococci were reported. In this study, we described the changing epidemiology of the pneumococcal carriage population in South Africa, by sequencing the genomes of 1825 isolates collected between 2009 and 2013. Using these genomic data, we reported the changes in serotypes, Global Pneumococcal Sequence Clusters (GPSCs), and antibiotic resistance before and after the introduction of PCV13. The pneumococcal carriage population in South Africa has a high level of diversity, comprising of 126 GPSCs and 49 serotypes. Of the ten most prevalent GPSCs detected, six were predominantly found in Africa (GPSC22, GPSC21, GPSC17, GPSC33, GPSC34 and GPSC52). We found a significant decrease in PCV7 serotypes (19F, 6B, 23F and 14) and an increase in non-vaccine serotypes (NVT) (16F, 34, 35B and 11A) among children <2 years of age. The increase in NVTs was driven by pneumococcal lineages GPSC33, GPSC34, GPSC5 and GPSC22. Overall, a decrease in antibiotic resistance for 11 antimicrobials was detected in the PCV13 era. Further, we reported a higher resistance prevalence among vaccine types (VTs), as compared to NVTs; however, an increase in penicillin resistance among NVT was observed between the PCV7 and PCV13 eras. The carriage isolates from South Africa predominantly belonged to pneumococcal lineages, which are endemic to Africa. While the introduction of PCV resulted in an overall reduction of resistance in pneumococcal carriage isolates, an increase in penicillin resistance among NVTs was detected in children aged between 3 and 5 years, driven by the expansion of penicillin-resistant clones associated with NVTs in the PCV13 era.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Wellcome Sanger Institute (Award Core Wellcome Grant 206194)
    • Principle Award Recipient: StephenD. Bentley
  • Wellcome Sanger Institute (Award Core Wellcome Grant 098051)
    • Principle Award Recipient: StephenD. Bentley
  • Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (Award OPP1034556)
    • Principle Award Recipient: StephenD. Bentley
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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/content/journal/mgen/10.1099/mgen.0.000831
2022-06-23
2024-07-24
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