1887

Abstract

is a food-borne pathogen with epidemic potential that causes cholera-like acute gastroenteritis and sometimes extraintestinal infections in humans. However, research on its genetic diversity and pathogenicity-related genetic elements based on whole genome sequences is lacking. In this study, we collected and sequenced 130 strains of from 14 provinces of China, and also determined the susceptibility of 35 of the strains to 30 different antibiotics. Combined with 52 publicly available genomes, we inferred the population structure and investigated the characteristics of pathogenicity-related factors. The strains exhibited high levels of homologous recombination and were assigned to two major populations, VflPop1 and VflPop2, according to the different compositions of their gene pools. VflPop2 was subdivided into groups 2.1 and 2.2. Except for VflPop2.2, which consisted only of Asian strains, the strains in VflPop1 and VflPop2.1 were distributed in the Americas, Asia and Europe. Analysis of the pathogenicity potential of showed that most of the identified virulence-related genes or gene clusters showed high prevalence in , except for three mobile genetic elements: pBD146, ICEInd1 and MGIInd1, which were scattered in only a few strains. A total of 21 antimicrobial resistance genes were identified in the genomes of the 182 strains analysed in this study, and 19 (90%) of them were exclusively present in VflPop2. Notably, the tetracycline resistance-related gene (35) was present in 150 (95%) of the strains in VflPop2, and in only one (4%) strain in VflPop1, indicating it was population-specific. In total, 91% of the 35 selected strains showed resistance to cefazolin, indicating has a high resistance rate to cefazolin. Among the 15 genomes that carried the previously reported drug resistance-related plasmid pBD146, 11 (73%) showed resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, which we inferred was related to the presence of the gene in the plasmid. On the basis of the population genomics analysis, the genetic diversity, population structure and distribution of pathogenicity-related factors of were delineated in this study. The results will provide further clues regarding the evolution and pathogenic mechanisms of , and improve our knowledge for the prevention and control of this pathogen.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (Award 2018ZX10713003-002-009)
    • Principle Award Recipient: WeiliLiang
  • Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (Award 2021YFC2300302)
    • Principle Award Recipient: WeiliLiang
  • Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (Award 2018YFC1603902)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YujunCui
  • Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (Award 2017YFC1601503)
    • Principle Award Recipient: XiaoyanPei
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License.
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2022-02-25
2024-07-23
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