1887

Abstract

Members of the genus are frequently associated with meat spoilage. The ability for low numbers of spores of certain species to germinate in cold-stored vacuum-packed meat can result in blown pack spoilage. However, little is known about the germination process of these clostridia, despite this characteristic being important for their ability to cause spoilage. This study sought to determine the genomic conditions for germination of 37 representative strains from seven species (, , , , , and ) by comparison with previously characterized germination genes from , and . All the genomes analysed contained at least one operon. Seven different operon configuration types were identified across genomes from , and . Differences arose between the genomes and those belonging to / in the number and type of genes coding for cortex lytic enzymes, suggesting the germination pathway of is different. However, the core components of the germination pathway were conserved in all the genomes analysed, suggesting that these species undergo the same major steps as for germination to occur.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • AgResearch (Award A25980)
    • Principle Award Recipient: GaleBrightwell
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-02-15
2024-07-23
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