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Abstract

Uropathogenic (UPEC) UTI89 is a well-characterized strain, which has mainly been used to study UPEC virulence during urinary tract infection (UTI). However, little is known on UTI89 key fitness-factors during growth in lab media and during UTI. Here, we used a transposon-insertion-sequencing approach (TraDIS) to reveal the UTI89 essential-genes for growth and fitness-gene-sets for growth in Luria broth (LB) and EZ-MOPS medium without glucose, as well as for human bacteriuria and mouse cystitis. A total of 293 essential genes for growth were identified and the set of fitness-genes was shown to differ depending on the growth media. A modified, previously validated UTI murine model, with administration of glucose prior to infection was applied. Selected fitness-genes for growth in urine and mouse-bladder colonization were validated using deletion-mutants. Novel fitness-genes, such as and involved in sulphur-acquisition, magnesium-uptake, and LPS-biosynthesis, were proved to be important during UTI. Moreover, was confirmed as relevant in both niches, and therefore it may represent a target for novel UTI-treatment/prevention strategies.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • This work has been funded by the Danish Research Council for Independent research, grant no. DFF-4184-00050 and PID2019-104439RB-C21 / AEI / 10.13039/501100011033 from the Agencia Estatal de Investigación (AEI, Spain), cofunded by the European Regional Development Fund of the European Union: a Way to Make Europe (FEDER). V.G. acknowledges the Consellería de Cultura, Educación e Ordenación Universitaria, Xunta de Galicia for her post-doctoral grant (ED481-B2018/018).
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2021-12-20
2022-01-28
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